Physics

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Category archives for Physics

Star Light, Star Bright…

On Aardvarchaeology, Martin Rundkvist tells us that the Geminid meteor shower is peaking tonight, so if you’ve got any wishes on the back burner, now’s your chance to make them. Of course these shooting “stars” are really bits of extinct comet 3200 Phaethon’s “sandy exhaust trail” burning up in the atmosphere—if you prefer some main…

In his regular life, graduate student Matt Springer teaches undergraduates the basics of physics: the mechanics of heat, rotational motion, the relationship between kinetic and potential energy, and more. Matt takes a similarly instructional approach on his blog Built on Facts, walking readers through equations and concepts that might have grown a bit fuzzy since…

The Buzz: Feynman Lectures Online

In 1964, Richard Feynman delivered a series of seven lectures to students at Cornell University on “The Character of Physical Law.” Decades later, the video footage of the lectures was purchased by Bill Gates—who has said that Feynman could have inspired him to go into physics rather than software—and on Wednesday, Microsoft Research announced that…

Our physicists-in-residence at ScienceBlogs enjoy catching a few waves every now and then—but what kind? In the most recent installment of his Dorky Poll series, Chad Orzel asked his readers at Uncertain Principles which they preferred: Waves which oscillate perpendicular to their direction of motion—transverse waves—or longitudinal waves, which oscillate in a parallel direction. Matt…

In an article in The New York Times Magazine Sunday, Freeman Dyson—best known for his work in theoretical physics—discussed his belief that climate change is an issue that should be approached with skepticism. ScienceBloggers responded with thoughtful consideration. Dyson stated in the Times piece that while prevailing dogmas about climate change may be right, they…

The Buzz: Body of Copernicus Found

Last week, scientists positively identified the bones of Nicolaus Copernicus, the astronomer credited with scientifically formulating the idea that the universe is heliocentric and prompting the 16th century scientific revolution. To be sure that the bones were actually those of Copernicus, the scientists compared DNA from the unmarked remains found in a grave beneath Frombork…

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings of 2008 are over, but we are archiving the video interviews that the ScienceBlogs.de team conducted in Lindau with a variety of laureates. Interviewed here is Nobelist Theodor Hänsch, winner of the 2005 Prize in Physics. Onsite Coverage THE 2008 MEETINGS OF NOBEL LAUREATES IN LINDAU Courtesy of scienceblogs.de |…

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings of 2008 are over, but we are archiving the video interviews that the ScienceBlogs.de team conducted in Lindau with a variety of laureates. Interviewed here is Nobelist Peter Grünberg, winner of the 2007 Prize in Physics. Onsite Coverage THE 2008 MEETINGS OF NOBEL LAUREATES IN LINDAU Courtesy of scienceblogs.de |…

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings of 2008 are over, but we are archiving the video interviews that the ScienceBlogs.de team conducted in Lindau with a variety of laureates. Interviewed here is Nobelist Hartmut Michel, who shared with Johann Deisenhofer the 1988 Prize in Chemistry. Onsite Coverage THE 2008 MEETINGS OF NOBEL LAUREATES IN LINDAU Courtesy…

The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings of 2008 are over, but we’ll be archiving the video interviews that the ScienceBlogs.de team conducted in Lindau with a variety of laureates. Here, Nobelist Johann Deisenhofer (Chemistry, 1988) discusses the work that led to his prize: the discovery of the 3-D structure of a photosynthetic reaction center. Onsite Coverage…