Shifting Baselines

One-fifth of the advice on how to save our oceans in the current issue of Conservation Magazine came from two-thirds of my graduate committee. Check out the ocean advice of Daniel Pauly and Rashid Sumaila and the other eight ideas in 10 Solutions to Save the Oceans. Any favorites?

Comments

  1. #1 Mark Powell
    August 13, 2007

    One key solution is missing from the list. We need to connect people with ocean life, and take people under the surface.

    Pictures of nice beaches provide a soothing but cool and disconnected view of the oceans. We need to do the Jacques Cousteau thing and connect people to the majesty of ocean life and the tragedy of unnecessary harm done through thoughless or reckless ocean abuse.

  2. #2 Emmett Duffy
    August 14, 2007

    I agree wholeheartedly with Mark. Taking a page from Richard Louv’s great book “Last Child in the Woods”, we should aim to “leave no child onshore”, or perhaps leave no child inland. The slogan could use crafting but you get the point.

    The list of ten solutions here is great — much food for thought — and action.

  3. #3 Karen.b@sterlingbrands.com
    August 21, 2007

    This is wonderful! It would also be great to get the 10 things that each individual can do. I’d love to pass on that to my friends who need the easy steps they can take in their lives to help with the situation.

  4. #4 sex
    February 13, 2009

    Yes Thats is a good idea. Thanks al ot

  5. #5 network marketing
    March 25, 2009

    thanks

  6. #6 film izle
    September 8, 2010

    The authors found that the frequencies of allergic and IgE-associated allergic disease and sensitization were similar in the children who had received probiotic and those who’d gotten placebo. Although there appeared to be a preventive effect at age 2, there was none noted at age 5. Interestingly, in babies born by cesarean section, the researchers found less IgE-associated allergic disease in those who had received the probiotic.

  7. #7 müzik dinle
    September 8, 2010

    The authors found that the frequencies of allergic and IgE-associated allergic disease and sensitization were similar in the children who had received probiotic and those who’d gotten placebo. Although there appeared to be a preventive effect at age 2, there was none noted at age 5. Interestingly, in babies born by cesarean section, the researchers found less IgE-associated allergic disease in those who had received the probiotic.