Speaking Science 2.0

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As we argue in the Nisbet & Mooney Framing Science thesis, infotainment dominates science as a news narrative. Despite record amounts of media attention, climate change still routinely falls short of a top news agenda item, making it exceedingly difficult to engage a broader American audience by way of traditional science communication efforts. In my…

The answer is probably not, but journal editors do have other motives and incentives involved than just publishing technically sound research. With the publication of two studies last week that shaped the framing of the stem cell vote in Congress, over at Framing Science, I explain the “negotiation of scientific newsworthiness” that goes on between…

Monday night we delivered our latest presentation of the Nisbet & Mooney Framing Science thesis at the new headquarters of the New York Academy of Sciences. Close to 150 people turned out for what proved to be a lively Q&A and reception that followed. The talk was covered by the Columbia Journalism Review and blogged…

Framing occurs across the news production process. It’s a function of reporter and source interaction, the decisions made by editors, and the intended audience for the news report. Over at Framing Science, I detail a classic example, as the same story filed by Andrew Revkin was edited very differently at the sister pubs The International…

It’s official: The “Speaking Science 2.0″ talk is now viewable in its entirety on YouTube: The presentation above is the one given by Matt and myself at the annual meeting of the American Institute of Biological Sciences a few weeks back. Unfortunately, you can’t see the PowerPoint slides; you can only see us talking. So…

In a letter published this past week at Science, Cornell University professors and media relations staff offer their recommendations on media training courses and activities for scientists. (The authors include Bruce Lewenstein, a member of my committee when I did my PhD at Cornell and also my MS advisor.) The recommendations are based on a…

Historically, scientists and journalists have followed closely a set of ground rules that govern their interactions, leading to a “negotiation of newsworthiness” when it comes to science. Yet this co-production of coverage often leads to what Andrew Revkin calls the “tyranny of the news peg,” defining news in science as the release of a new…

Over at Framing Science I have a post up about the vast potential that social networking sites, particularly Facebook, hold for reaching non-traditional audiences for science. Effective use of Facebook by scientists, science organizations, and science enthusiasts would incorporate two of the central strategies we advocate in our Speaking Science 2.0 tour. Specifically, Facebook 1)…

In a segment from the recent Frontline special “Hot Politics,” GOP pollster Frank Luntz explains his 1997/1998 memo that became the playbook for how conservatives like President Bush and Senator James Inhofe redefined climate change as really a matter of “scientific uncertainty” and “unfair economic burden.” (Luntz says he has since changed his views on…

On May 3, as part of the annual AAAS Forum on Science & Technology Policy, retired Congressman Sherwood Boehlert (R-NY), the former chair of the House Science & Technology committee, gave the keynote William Carey lecture (full text). In his address, he devoted several pages of his speech to our Policy Forum article at Science…