“I guess I just prefer to see the dark side of things. The glass is always half-empty. And cracked. And I just cut my lip on it. And chipped a tooth.” -Janeane Garofalo

During the week, it’s all about the natural wonders of the Universe here, about what we know and how we know it, and about our place as human beings in the grand scheme of things. But on the weekend, I hope to bring you a little bit of the joys and wonders that, as humans, we create for ourselves on this little blue marble. Have a listen to the Puppini Sisters’ wonderful interpretation of a Blondie classic,

Heart Of Glass,

while I showcase to you one of the oldest glass-working techniques out there: murrine.

Image credit: Simona Clementoni of http://loscrignodipreziosa.blogspot.com/2011/01/novita-su-misshobby.html#axzz34kr3ngeJ.

Image credit: Simona Clementoni of http://loscrignodipreziosa.blogspot.com/2011/01/novita-su-misshobby.html#axzz34kr3ngeJ.

Normally, this technique involves the melding together of numerous colored glass rods to create patterns on the inside, patterns which only unveil themselves when you slice through them and reveal the cross-section. But one artist — Loren Stump — has done something innovative with this 4,000 year old technique that I don’t think has ever been done before: layered the glass just so to create intricate portraits on the inside!

Image credit: © 2014 stumpchuck, Loren Stump, via http://www.stumpchuck.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=173718978.

Image credit: © 2014 stumpchuck, Loren Stump, via http://www.stumpchuck.com/apps/photos/photo?photoid=173718978.

Go take a detailed look at the whole story, along with his most wonderful artistic creations!