i-fa5b0a66f0ea6e6c3d8e66888e56d0bd-hornet-990707-N-6483G-001.jpg

Isn’t it lovely (it isn’t new. The pic is from 1999 and I’ve seen it before. But seeing it on someone’s wiki page reminded me). Far better than a Green Hornet.

Or maybe you’d rather listen to the wabbit.

[Update: see various comments. The situation is more complex than I though, and possibly not fully understood. See-also cute pix here -W]

Comments

  1. #1 John S. Wilkins
    2010/07/09

    No, it’s not. It’s passing through a condensation point. See here.

  2. #2 Phillip IV
    2010/07/09

    Oh. That kind of hornet. If it had been vespa crabro, it would have been a lot more sensational.

  3. #3 Andrew
    2010/07/09

    Such a picturesque way of delivering death and destruction.

  4. #4 Hank Roberts
    2010/07/09

    http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/sound/soubar.html
    “This photo of the B-2 Spirit Stealth Bomber, which does not break the sound barrier, shows that the extraordinary cloud effect is not exactly tied to the breaking of the sound barrier….”

    Some of these images would be lovely to see photoshopped with a real hornet. Or perhaps a huge manatee.

  5. #5 Torbjörn Larsson, OM
    2010/07/09

    “breaking the sound barrier”. On a science blog, no less. Oy vey, the power of folk tales/physics is strong in this one society.

  6. #6 Hank Roberts
    2010/07/09

    > If the associated volumes cannot quickly change,
    > then the ideal gas law suggests that the temperature
    > in the low pressure regions must drop

    Well, that refutes the theory that the temperature of Venus is so high due to supersonic flights by its natives, anyhow.

  7. #7 oyunlar
    2010/07/10

    to pass the speed of sound. looks incredibly beautiful. Who knows how the transition will be the speed of light.

  8. #8 Mark
    2010/12/30

    Nice photo!