Cold again

DSC_5850-frost-spikes-on-fennel

and yet more photo spam:

DSCN1502-coton-footpath-frost-morning

Last week it was cold. It was warmer at the weekend. But this week it is cold again. Though as RC points out, its not going to be the coldest winter for a millenium.

DSC_5853-phoebe-a-table We went rowing tonight. Oddly enough we were the only crew out. We had to stop past the Elizabeth way bridge due to ice on the river – not solid sheets at that point, but enough floating bits to warn us that worse was coming. Very cold, I rowed with a glove on my inner hand and only survived by sticking my outer hand down my trousers when we span. Still it was a good warm-up for a pint in the Fort. Christmas Head this weekend. We are “Rage against the machine”, apparently a popular beat combo.

The pic is out front-garden fennel, with those cute icy spikes that grow when it is substantially sub-zero (about -4 oC) and very still. Close-up of the spikes on a branch, though the light is poor.

In other news just in, our cat is cute.

Refs

* Amy is iced in
* Apparently in other bits of England its a bit more serious
* Hansen points out that while its been cold here it has been warm elsewhere.

Comments

  1. #1 Marco
    2010/12/08

    I see Phoebe has not yet mastered the “evil look” yet. I really think it (I’m assuming she’s an it) is trying to tell you guys that bread is not its preferred food, but it does like to be fed. I’ve had my share of lessons in catspeak.

    Anyway, just for laughs:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AYfuimVGutM

  2. #2 Adam
    2010/12/08

    Looking like warmer at the weekend again, then cold again next week.

  3. #3 Wiki LIAR Watcher
    2010/12/08

    Hey, edit a few climate change articles in Wiki, that’ll warm ya up!

  4. #4 kjr
    2010/12/08

    That update link, other bits of england a bit worse – goes to a story about motorway in Scotland. Surely you don’t approach ‘detail’ in such a casual manner as some?

    [Ah, you noticed :-) -W]

  5. #6 Vinny Burgoo
    2010/12/08

    If that’s not an evil look…

  6. #7 thomas hine
    2010/12/08

    How cold before you eat him?

  7. #8 crandles
    2010/12/09

    Cold -> arctic sea ice hmm maybe a little off topic:

    120 contracts on MIN.ARCTIC.ICE:2011>2007 looks like better volume than last year. Some of those were at 50 and most recent at 25. Only a 25% chance of there not being a record low extent per JAXA, does that sound low to you?

    [Ah, that sounds more interesting. Where are said contracts? Intrade? Alas blocked from work. Must look later. However, the current ice extent (http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/en/home/seaice_extent.htm) is interesting -W]

  8. #9 crandles
    2010/12/09

    Yes intrade. Sorry I missed including that.

  9. #10 Steve Bloom
    2010/12/09

    Interesting, sure, but probably still not connected to next September. If it stays low for the next three months, Katy bar the door (IMHO). Ah, it feels so good to be the voice of moderation. :)

    But it is a little scary to see Nuuk approaching sun-bathing temps at this time of year.

  10. #11 Adam
    2010/12/13

    Back to the cold air in Europe: is it possible that reduced Arctic sea ice is affecting weather patterns? Because Hudson Bay (and Baffin Bay, west of Greenland) are at significantly lower latitudes than most of the Arctic Ocean, global warming may cause them to remain ice free into early winter after the Arctic Ocean has become frozen insulating the atmosphere from the ocean. The fixed location of the Hudson-Baffin heat source could plausibly affect weather patterns, in a deterministic way — Europe being half a Rossby wavelength downstream, thus producing a cold European anomaly in the trans-Atlantic seesaw. Several ideas about possible effects of the loss of Arctic sea ice on weather patterns are discussed in papers referenced by Overland, Wang and Walsh.

    However, we note in our Reviews of Geophysics paper in press that the few years just prior to 2009-2010, with low Arctic sea ice, did not produce cold winters in Europe. The cold winter of 2009-2010 was associated with the most extreme Arctic Oscillation in the period of record. Figure 3, from our paper in press, shows that 7 of the last 10 European winters were warmer than the 1951-1980 average winter, and 10 of the past 10 summers were warmer than climatology. The average warming of European winters is at least as large as the average warming of summers, but it is less noticeable because of the much greater variability in winter.

    From http://data.giss.nasa.gov/gistemp/2010november/

  11. #12 crandles
    2010/12/21

    >”However, the current ice extent (http://www.ijis.iarc.uaf.edu/en/home/seaice_extent.htm) is interesting”

    more interesting now?

    [Oooh yes that is a bit exciting isn't it! Hmmm, very interesting... -W]

The site is undergoing maintenance presently. Commenting has been disabled. Please check back later!