Stranger Fruit

Archives for January, 2006

Darwin’s Nemesis … despite Dover

The next big thing for the ID movement will be the publication of Darwin’s Nemesis: Philip Johnson and the Intelligent Design Movement in April. I have previously discussed this festschrift for Johnson here and here. Over at Uncommon Descent, Dembski – whose “retirement” from blogging doesn’t seem to have slowed his posting – is shilling…

Looking forward and glancing back

I didn’t really have time to blog anything today, primarily because I was preparing a talk on the Cambrian explosion that I am giving tonight. The weekend will likely be quiet as well, as I need to finish preparations for the new semester which starts on Tuesday. So, for those of you who are perhaps…

The (Wrong) Reason For Everything

There is a nice piece in The New Republic (Jan 16th, unfortunately not online) titled “A Reason For Everything” in which Alan Wolfe reviews Rodney Stark’s book The Victory of Reason: How Christianity Led to Freedom, Capitalism, and Western Success (Random, 2005; Amazon). Stark is a sociologist (rather than an historian) at Baylor University, and…

Decision

So I’ve finally decided to move the whole blog over to here … at least until I get sick of MoveableType You no longer will have to check my old blog, except when I link back to old articles. Here’s hoping this works out.

Casey Luskin, lawyer and program officer for public policy and legal affairs at the DI has this to say about the El Tajon creationism class: Intelligent design is different from creationism because intelligent design is based upon empirical data, rather than religious scripture, and also because intelligent design is not a theory about the age…

A Darwinian Debt

While finishing up graduate school, I worked for the Irish government on on a project to study fish stocks in the Irish Sea – this involved modelling biological and economic aspects with a view to the long term survival of the stocks. This, therefore, caught my eye: Why does it take so long for fish…

And there’s more …

With my move over to ScienceBlogs I have been thinking about the direction I want to take my blogging. Readers of my old blog will remember that I spent a lot of the time their ranting about intelligent design, politics, ASU sports, etc. I have decided to continue doing so over there, so if you…

Musings on the life academic

One of the things which I think I’m going to do here which I didn’t do at my old blog is write a little about academic life. As a scientist, I am in the relatively unusual position of not actually teaching “real” science classes – by that I mean the courses, while dealing with science,…

Teaching Design

I have been teaching an upper-division course on Origins, Evolution and Creation since 1998; the course has been very popular and has been cross-listed as both Biology (BIO) and History and Philosophy of Science (HPS). Every year I get 40 or so students from varying religious and educational backgrounds and we examine the evidence for…

So what do you see? A groove and some lines? Truth be told, this is possibly the oldest recorded chordate fossil (or, should I say, one of a number of seventeen specimens of same). It dates from the pre-Cambrian – i.e. before 543 million years ago – during a period known as the Ediacarian. Found…