Science Education

Stranger Fruit

Category archives for Science Education

Some bad news before I go …

From a report released by BIO: The Biotechnology Industry Organization: On average, only 28% of the high school students taking the ACT , which is a national standardized test for college admission , reached a score indicating college readiness for biology and no state reached even 50%. Only 52% of 12th graders are at or…

I spent this morning at a workshop for K-12 biology teachers. The workshop was organized by the School of Life Sciences here at ASU and gave some 20 students to interact with faculty regarding teaching evolution. My presentation was titled “Teaching Evolution One Icon At A Time” and aimed to educate the teachers regarding the…

DI Proxies Defeated in Florida

Yet another defeat for the anti-evolutionists. NCSE is reporting that Florida’s Senate Bill 2396 has died in committee. To recap: Mississippi – dead in committee Oklahoma – dead in committee Iowa – dead in committee New Mexico – dead in committee Florida – dead in committee Alabama – in committee Missouri – in committee Texas…

In the past I have argued that historians of science probably need to get more involved with the fight for good science education. Michael Barton has brought my attention to historian Abigail Lustig giving testimony before the Texas Board of Education.

The Arizona Education Association is reporting that nearly 4,500 K-12 teachers and other personnel have been pink-slipped for the next school year. What is truly worrying about this is that it is based on reports from only 36 of the 220 districts statewide and more layoffs are inevitable. You may remember that Republican lawmakers called…

SkeptiCamp Phoenix 2009

SkeptiCamp Phoenix 2009 went off wonderfully yesterday. Big thanks to Jim Lippard for doing such a wonderful organizational job. The picture above is me beginning my 20 minute gallop through the issue of academic freedom and the intelligent design movement. Shorter – and undoubtedly more coherent –  version is: Evolution is not an unchallengeable orthodoxy…

The DI-inspired “Academic Freedom/Strengths & Weaknesses” bill that was in committee in New Mexico has failed to get a hearing before close of session and has thus expired. Dave Thomas has more over at PT. The state of play for 2009 must be depressing for the DI Mississippi – dead in committee Oklahoma – dead…

Texas

Texas House Bill 4224 (introduced yesterday) attempts to introduce “strengths and weaknesses” language, despite opposition from scientists and educators. More over at NCSE.

Over at PT, Hector Avalos is reporting that the deadline has passed for the DI-inspired “Evolution Academic Freedom Act? (HF 183) to move out of committee in Iowa. This one is now officially dead. Thus the scorecard so far looks like: Mississippi – dead in committee Oklahoma – dead in committee Iowa – dead in…

Florida joins the pack

NCSE is reporting that SB 2396 has been proposed in Florida. It will require "thorough presentation and critical analysis of the scientific theory of evolution." The bill is sponsored by Stephen R. Wise (R-District 5). Amazing how many of these bills are being sponsored by Republicans. You’d think they’d have more important things to worry…