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All of My Faults Are Stress Related

Category archives for links

Science’s online education prize

Science has an award for online education resources (cutely named “SPORE”), and they want nominations by June 30. Here are their criteria: Rules of Eligibility for SPORE-2009: * The project must focus on science education. * The resources described must be freely available on the Internet. * The project can be targeted to students or…

Linkfest: world oceans day

Much of the celebration of World Oceans Day focuses on the ocean’s importance as an ecosystem, especially in relation to climate change. But the bottom of the ocean is still relatively unknown – I’ve been told by marine geologists that we know the topography of Venus better than that of our own planet, because we…

The Accretionary Wedge is back!

The Accretionary Wedge, the monthly carnival of geology, is still alive! Or, well, it’s still active, at least. Its originator, Brian, got too busy to keep it up, so he handed off responsibilities to Lockwood (of Outside the Interzone), Chris (of goodSchist and the Podclast), and me. Lockwood will be hosting the next Accretionary Wedge,…

In the news this week: Andy Revkin at the NY Times has a news story and a blog post about the UN’s new report assessing disaster risk. One of the experts quoted in his story sent him a comment with a lot of concern about the promotional video. Dave Petley (who writes Dave’s Landslide Blog)…

Water wars & regulation

Water. Too much and you drown, not enough and you die of thirst. Getting it just right is important. But how? One of the fears associated with global warming is that it could lead to droughts that could lead to wars. There was an essay in Nature in March that argued that those wars don’t…

California needs geology!

Ok, you’re probably thinking. Now she’s really lost it. California’s got earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, coastal erosion, oil, gold, sinking ground, a funky inland delta with levees in danger of failing, major water issues… and that’s not even getting into the really cool stuff, like serpentinites and blueschists and pillow basalts and forearc basin sediments and…

One year ago today, a M 7.9 earthquake struck the Chinese province of Sichuan. It was horrific. I don’t have anything profound or helpful to say about it myself, but I want to pass on links to other remembrances: Berkeley SeismoBlog explains the tectonics of the earthquake, and the possibility (raised in the Chinese journal…

I got back from a conference Tuesday night, and came home to the craziness of the semester’s end. Part of me wants to blog about how cool undergraduate research is, after we had our big school-wide undergraduate research symposium, but I really should be grading the proposals for next year’s senior thesis projects. (Which will…

I’ve got one wallet-sized version of the 1983 Geological Society of America time scale in my field pouch, and another page-sized version that used to be taped to the wall in front of my desk. I relied on it a lot, especially when starting work in a new field area. In the early 90’s, when…

Links for 3-21-09

Calls to arms: Chris at goodSchist is looking for help to work on the wikipedia page on the mantle. Since he posted, some people have taken on the challenge, but someone who thinks the mantle is too cold to convect is arguing that the revisions violate wikipedia’s neutral point of view. Eric at Eruptions wants…