water

All of My Faults Are Stress Related

Category archives for water

Geologic causes vs geologic triggers

There’s a great, new online news article by Science’s Richard Kerr about the role of the Zipingpu Dam in last year’s Wenchuan earthquake. A new article in Geophysical Research Letters (which I haven’t read – my library doesn’t have access to GRL) tests the plausibility of water as a trigger for the Wenchuan quake, and…

Geobloggers take on DonorsChoose

There’s an issue of Eos sitting on my desk at work with a front-page article about how to manage outreach. Earth scientists know stuff that’s important – this week’s huge earthquakes (covered all over the geoblogosphere) are just one example. Water’s another. And climate. And volcanoes. And landslides. And… well, you get the picture. So…

Water expertise on Sb, now official

Anne Jefferson, a hydro-geomorpho-climate geologist at UNC-Charlotte, has officially joined Highly Allochthonous as Chris Rowan’s co-blogger. Anne’s been unofficially co-blogging there for a while, but it’s great to see her role made more official. And it’s especially great to see someone with expertise in water and surface processes on Sb. (Anne and I are also…

Water wars & regulation

Water. Too much and you drown, not enough and you die of thirst. Getting it just right is important. But how? One of the fears associated with global warming is that it could lead to droughts that could lead to wars. There was an essay in Nature in March that argued that those wars don’t…

This is a post for World Water Day. See more posts about transboundary water at Cr!key Creek. For the past two years, my intro Earth Science students have been doing a project monitoring one of our local rivers. On the one hand, it’s just another stream, small enough for students to safely wade into it…

Course redesign 4: time for a plan

I’ve been blogging my way throug the redesign of my upper-level general education course, “The Control of Nature,” using a course design tutorial from SERC. I’ve talked about what’s gone wrong in the past, about who my students are and what they need from the class, and about my tentative goals for the class. I’ve…

I’m rethinking one of my courses, an upper level general education course called “The Control of Nature.” I’ve been blogging my way through the course redesign process, starting with past problems with the course and with my various practical constraints (class schedule, physical space, student background). I’m using an online tutorial to guide me through…

Redesigning a broken course

I’ve got a course that (IMO) is broken, and I’m working on fixing it. I’ve been teaching a course called “The Control of Nature” (after John McPhee’s book) for 16 years, after thinking of the idea on my way home from my first academic job interview. (Yes, that was a bad time to come up…

Cr!key Creek invites bloggers to join him on World Water Day, March 22, and post about water basins and aquifers that cross political boundaries. Here’s what he said: There are hundreds of water basins and aquifers that straddle our political boundaries, at both international and national levels. Neighbours stick their own straws into the same…

Stuff I’m reading

There has been a lot of cool stuff posted while I was getting this blog set up. From my Google Reader shared items: Exotic rocks. There’s an art exhibit in Oakland, California, that includes metamorphic rocks from Maine. Why? Because the schists sound like xylophone keys when they’re struck. I knew there was a reason…