Bioethics

Terra Sigillata

Category archives for Bioethics

In addition to my own photos herein, Tom McLaughlin posted a nice slide show of the day at his South Boston News & Record. Despite two trees that snapped and fell in my driveway within six feet of my car in an impressive thunderstorm Friday evening, I drove on Saturday morning to Clover, Virginia, for…

Today at the University of California at Los Angeles, a rally is planned to raise awareness about the value of responsible animal research and to denounce acts of terrorism toward animal researchers and their families. The highlight of the Pro-Test rally will be the presentation to legislators and the media a petition with nearly 12,000…

On Friday, I wrote a post about the 20th anniversary of my PhD dissertation defense and my reverence for Henrietta Lacks, the woman whose cervical cancer gave rise to the first immortalized human cell line and the primary system for my work. I also alluded to The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks, the upcoming book…

A black woman, a white boy, and a PhD

Twenty years ago this morning, I had to defend a body of work that contained this paragraph on page 24: HeLa cells are a human cervical carcinoma cell line having a doubling time of 24 hr and were obtained from Dr. Bert Flanegan, Dept. of Immunology and Microbiology, University of Florida. HeLa cells were maintained…

Hella HeLa! Skloot is PWned, as it were. I learned late last night that author Rebecca Skloot was to be featured on the cover of this week’s issue of Publishers Weekly. So, I clicked on the site this morning before the coffee was even done brewing and there is our wordsmithing hero. I know that…

Back in February 2007, we had a lively discussion on a post about pharmacist objection to filling prescriptions for drugs they felt went again their personal moral stance: from morning-after pills to garden-variety oral contraceptives. I held that since pharmacists are licensed by the state to provide a service to the citizenry (and they make…

Misha Angrist’s Naked Genome

Picking up the Sunday paper after walking the PharmBeagle, I saw Dr Misha Angrist of the Duke University Institute for Genome Sciences & Policy featured on the frontpage of the local fishwrapper. Ace higher ed reporter, Eric Ferreri, put together a lovely article on this local hero. As Misha notes elsewhere: In 2007 I became…

“Prescribing ‘placebo treatments': results of national survey of US internists and rheumatologists,” is the title of a newly-published article in the 23 October issue of BMJ (British Medical Journal). The full text article and PDF are available for free at the time of this posting. In this study of 679 US physicians, Tilburt et al.…

Escalating lunacy

It’s a lovely crescent moon this evening up here in the Northern Hemisphere so I can’t blame the latest unbelievable and irrational happenings on a full moon (which would be unscientific, of course). Okay, maybe sunspots? First, the Bush administration was proposing draft legislation to grant medical professionals the right to withhold care, prescriptions, etc.,…

Dr Kimball Atwood IV at Science-Based Medicine and my long-time blogging colleague Orac have spilled oceans of e-ink on the institutionalization of alternative or integrative medicine in North America’s top academic medical centers. Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is now often called “integrative medicine” to intellectually justify the incorporation of evidence-free, anecdotal practices into the…