Pharmacoeconomics

Terra Sigillata

Category archives for Pharmacoeconomics

Well, it’s mid-May at 36° North, the honeysuckles are blooming, my allergies are miserable, the air is damp, and that can only mean one thing: the American Society for Clinical Oncology (ASCO) meeting is nearly upon us. Held this year beginning on 29 May, the annual ASCO meeting coincides with all sorts of announcements of…

I know that many of you have seen this article by Matthew Perronne since it was picked up by the majority of AP outlets this morning: Two drugmakers spent hundreds of millions of dollars last year to raise awareness of a murky illness, helping boost sales of pills recently approved as treatments and drowning out…

This whole “cosmeceutical” thing probably shouldn’t be in “Medicine & Health” but we did call your attention to today’s news item back on 27 July 2007: Drug maker Allergan announced at a stock analyst’s meeting this afternoon that it is filing a New Drug Application (NDA) for a cosmetic form of its anti-glaucoma drug bimatoprost…

We’ve been speaking about this issue on behalf of our lymphoma colleagues since late August. But yesterday’s New York Times (Alex Berenson) and Wall Street Journal’s Health Blog (Jacob Goldstein) brought greater awareness to the issue of Medicare’s proposal to cut reimbursement for “smart-bomb” radioimmunotherapies for lymphomas. So far, it appears that Medicare will move…

Compounds in grapefruit juice inhibits an enzyme required for metabolism of nearly half of prescription drugs on the market. If you inhibit drug metabolism, would that allow you to take a lower (and cheaper) dose of one of those drugs, especially an expensive drug? That is the proposition of a company called Bioavailability Systems, featured…

As I sat to write a post this morning, I became more engaged in a story in the New York Times magazine by Dr Daniel Carlat entitled, “Dr. Drug Rep.” Joseph of Corpus Callosum recently commented here about being solicited to recommend fellow physicians in the local area and nationally who he perceived as “thought…

The travesty has come true, according to Karl Schwartz and Betsy de Parry of Patients Against Lymphoma. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has gone ahead with their plans to slash by half reimbursements to hospitals for two radioimmunotherapy drugs. For many hospital, reimbursement rates will be lower than their acquisition costs. We…

We wrote a few days ago on the disappointing discontinuation of Pfizer’s Exubera, the first inhaled insulin product. The always-insightful Dr Derek Lowe at In the Pipeline has an excellent commentary on this case, including his own take on the futility of putting lipstick on a pig: 1. Marketing isn’t everything. The next time someone…

Don’t Bogart My Insulin

Scott Hensley at the WSJ.com Health Blog had a banner day today with the sad withdrawal by Pfizer of their inhaled insulin product, Exubera. When I was a pharmacy professor in the mid-1990s, we shared Pharma’s optimism that an inhaled insulin product would be a godsend for diabetes patients who had to inject themselves with…

The Pump Handle’s Liz Borowski put up a nice post summarizing the key points of the >400-page Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (H.R. 3580). Missing from the bill were any further restrictions on pharmaceutical direct-to-consumer (DTC) drug advertising – according to Liz, some drug safety advocates were calling for a complete ban…