Science education

Terra Sigillata

Category archives for Science education

In attempting to re-engage my academic brain stem, I’ve been doing a little continuing education the last couple of weeks at various forums hosted by the University-That-Tobacco-Built. Last week I had the pleasure of attending a forum of the Duke student organization, Women in Science and Engineering (WiSE), that featured four academic leaders (who were…

[Welcome mental_floss blog and Daily Kos readers. After you read about this outstanding young woman, you can learn more about me, my life story, and this blog here.] If you read elsewhere at ScienceBlogs.com, you’ll know that several bloggers have been discussing race and gender issues in the scientific and medical research communities as well…

Yes! “A Call for a Presidential Debate on Science & Technology.” Imagine a presidential debate focused solely on issues of science and technology as they relate to medicine, international competitiveness, terrorism, public health, embryonic stem cell research, bioethics of genotyping and other molecular diagnostics, research policy/funding and job creation, or minimization of health disparities, among…

One Day Left for DonorsChoose Drive

I chose not to plague you with incessant reminders to contribute to our drive to raise funds for projects at DonorsChoose.org – where public school teachers propose class projects and you decide which ones to fund. Just one post at kickoff and another halfway through. We just completed the drive for our local NPR station…

Dr Bruce Alberts, recently departed president of the US National Academy of Sciences and Professor of Biochemistry and Biophysics at UCSF, just spoke this morning at a symposium celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Duke University School of Medicine. The overall program is incredible, with four Nobel laureates in three days, plus a number of…

The ScienceBlogs/DonorsChoose raise-money-to-help-science-classrooms-a-thon! Those of us who blog here at ScienceBlogs think science is cool, important, and worth understanding. If you’re reading the blogs here, chances are you feel the same way. A lot of us fell in love with science because of early experiences in school — teachers who made science intriguing, exciting, maybe…

A renowned, non-profit curriculum development organization in Colorado Springs, CO, called BSCS (Biological Sciences Curriculum Study) has developed for NIH three FREE teaching modules for middle school teachers. The first is called, “Doing Science: The Process of Scientific Inquiry,” and helps students in grades 7-8 to develop and refine their critical-thinking skills. The complete press…