Scientific publishing

Terra Sigillata

Category archives for Scientific publishing

The Chronicle morning round-up

Waiting for that coffee to take effect but want it to appear you are doing something scholarly? Have a look at this pair of highly-read posts at The Chronicle of Higher Education: We Must Stop the Avalanche of Low-Quality Research The most-viewed article of the last two days at the online presence of the nation’s…

Men. Check. White. Check. Grey. Mostly. That dude must use color. Beards. Only two. Maybe three. Aw, hell, Church’s makes up for the rest. Article here. Ed Yong (Asian-British, man, young, dark hair, no beard) also lists a great wrap-up of the week’s commentary on the work.

Please forgive me for the cranky. I am still confined to bed and am only writing between fits of coughing that still occasionally drive me near unconsciousness due to hypoxia. I’m stuck at home trying to read some research literature across the VPN and proxy servers from my three faculty appointments that give me access…

My apologies to readers who have been looking for novel content the last few days. I am swamped with all variety of personal and professional issues but when I finally had a moment to write about something of value, I needed a copy of a short review article from a European cancer journal published by…

Just a quick note to dial up Ira Flatow’s Science Friday show on NPR today at 3 pm EDT. Supporting information and the archived show can be found here. Guy-who-I-would-kill-to-be, Tom Levenson, will be on with Ira to speak about his new book, Newton and the Counterfeiter: The Unknown Detective Career of the World’s Greatest…

Something to make Bora smile

Awhile back, I was given a PLoS T-shirt by Bora Zivkovic, science blogger extraordinaire and online community manager for PLoS-ONE, the flagship journal of the Public Library of Science. Every time I wear the dang thing, someone says something to me about the Open Access journal movement. Of course, I live in a rather science-dense…

By now you have already heard that my ScienceBlogs colleague, Shelley Batts of Retrospectacle, has been threatened with legal action if she did not remove published figures from a blog post. Shelley had a nifty post on a recent paper in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture detailing how treatment with naturally-occuring…