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As you begin your week, I was hoping that I might impose upon you for some suggestions or examples from your neck of the woods. Working with my talented and forward-thinking university Web Services colleague, Damond Nollan, I have the opportunity to craft from scratch a website for an academic department. I’ve found many examples…

This post is the third in a series on the origin and history of HeLa S3 cells. The first post details how I came about to ask this question when launching my independent research laboratory. The second post details the life and careers of the legendary physician-scientist pioneer, Dr. Florence Rena Sabin. Today, we take…

This post is the second in a series on the origin and history of HeLa S3 cells. The first post can be found here. In this post, we discuss the life and careers (yes, careers) of the remarkable physician-scientist, Florence Rena Sabin. “Too bad you’re not a boy, you would have made a good doctor.”…

When I first started my independent academic laboratory in 1992, it was in a brand new facility across the parking lot from a then 40-year-old building named in honor of the woman to the right. I took on a big teaching load from day one and while I had some cash left from the $50,000…

Here’s a great, last-minute opportunity to interact one-on-one with a major player in the field of environmental and dietary influences on gene expression. From the Duke University Office of News and Communications: Charles Darwin famously reasoned that genetic traits change over many generations through natural selection, but the new field of ?epigenetics? is finding that…

I’m a bit under the weather today but I wanted to at least share with you an interesting career development consideration pointed out by the always-excellent medicinal chemist blogger, Derek Lowe at In the Pipeline. In his post, What Should Non-Chemists Know About Medicinal Chemistry, Anyway?, Derek posits: Here’s a topic that I was discussing…

Hearty congratulations this morning to a group of early-career investigators who received this award yesterday in Washington, DC: The Presidential Award for Early Career Scientists and Engineers was established in 1996 and is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. [emphasis mine] Awardees are selected…

While the coffee wasn’t quite ready this morning, I ventured to the Wall Street Journal health page at the Wall Street Journal, one of my frequent first-reads. I was immediately intrigued by a short article from the excellent Jennifer Corbett Dooren about Roche-Genentech gaining US FDA approval for a new rheumatoid arthritis drug, Actemra. Actemra…

No, I’m not a millionaire either

This quick post is in response to one by DrugMonkey a few days ago entitled, “Nope, I just get my regular salary…” Drug speaks of the realities of federal research grant-supported scientists at US universities and research institutes and how the apparent large dollar figure grants do not line the pockets or supplement the salary…

Alright. I understand the prohibition on not taking photos of presenters’ data. However, prohibiting Twittering? Use of cameras and all other recording devices (this includes digital, film, and cell phone cameras, as well as audio recordings) are strictly prohibited in all session rooms, in the Exhibit Hall, and in all poster and oral presentation sessions.…