The Working Scientist

Terra Sigillata

Category archives for The Working Scientist

Dr Geraldine P Woods (1921-1999) was inarguably the most influential scientist in establishing and promoting NIH’s programs in research and research training for underrepresented groups. Therefore, I have chosen her story for my entry to this month’s Diversity in Science blog carnival recognizing Women’s History Month. My interest in Dr Woods was inspired by a…

I just wanted to send out congratulations to my friends and colleagues in Charleston at the Medical College of South Carolina (MUSC) on the 2 March announcement of their receipt of NCI Cancer Center designation:

Coolio! I think I would’ve applied for this. I assume NCI means either recent MS or PhD graduates: Applications are now open for the July 2009-January 2010 National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) Health Communications Internship Program, a 6 or 12-month program for graduate students or for persons who have recently completed a graduate degree interested in…

We here at the Terra Sig World Headquarters have been inundated with traffic directed by search engines following our post the other day directing readers to the NPR story on Douglas Prasher. Prasher, as is now widely known, is the former Woods Hole science who cloned the cDNA for green fluorescent protein (GFP) that enabled…

You probably thought this was going to be about Dr Robert Gallo. Driving in to lab this morning I heard Dan Charles’ story on NPR’s Morning Edition about the unheralded scientist, Dr Douglas Prasher, who first cloned the green fluorescent protein gene from Aequorea victoria in 1992, as published in Gene. This amazing laboratory tool,…

I am about to lead a discussion of science and medical blogs with a group of journalism students in a course entitled, Medical Journalism. While many of the students are specifically majoring in medical and science journalism in a master’s program, some are undergraduates in general journalism and mass communications looking to get a flavor…

DrDrA just posted on a currently 37-comment-long thread of a post by PhysioProf at DrugMonkey based on a quote from a post by Dr Brazen Hussy (opening sentence almost as long and convoluted as the title, eh?). The short summary: postdocs and other academic job candidates are disqualifying themselves from even applying for certain positions…

I had to laugh, through my tears of course, that the Bush administration’s bill requesting $700 billion for the Treasury Department to purchase failing mortgage assets is not even three pages long. Where did the idea come from for such a concise funding request??? Those of us with NIH research funding received e-mails last week…

You are an assistant professor in the biomedical sciences and are three or four years in, trying to really hammer on your productivity before the tenure dossier goes in a couple of years from now. Professor MegaMentor, editor of your society’s second-tier journal (impact factor of 2.5), approaches you to write an invited review article…

Jake Young, the MD/PhD student blogging at Pure Pedantry, has a great post this week on the detection of a novel formulation of the erythropoiesis stimulating agent (ESA) erythropoietin in Riccardo Riccó, the Italian cyclist who was thrown out of the Tour de France. Jake’s post is a superb primer on the use of this…