Women in science and medicine

Terra Sigillata

Category archives for Women in science and medicine

Was just checking the old SiteMeter stats before foraging for dinner and saw a surge in search hits for “Amy Bishop.” Yup. Lo and behold she has been charged with murder – for the 1986 death of her brother. From an article an hour ago by Donovan Slack and Shelley Murphy at the Boston Globe:…

Just the other day, I wrote about how DrugMonkey and I have experienced unprecedented and sustained blog traffic for posts we wrote in February on K2 Spice, one of a couple of marijuana-like “incense” products still sold legally in the United States. Every morning, I dial up my SiteMeter blog statistics and take a look…

In addition to my own photos herein, Tom McLaughlin posted a nice slide show of the day at his South Boston News & Record. Despite two trees that snapped and fell in my driveway within six feet of my car in an impressive thunderstorm Friday evening, I drove on Saturday morning to Clover, Virginia, for…

Men. Check. White. Check. Grey. Mostly. That dude must use color. Beards. Only two. Maybe three. Aw, hell, Church’s makes up for the rest. Article here. Ed Yong (Asian-British, man, young, dark hair, no beard) also lists a great wrap-up of the week’s commentary on the work.

I did not turn on the computer yesterday (yes, it was glorious) so I missed Mother’s Day coverage in our local newspaper. When we returned home, I was happy to see that on the front page of the print copy the dean of Duke School of Medicine, Nancy Andrews, MD, PhD, was featured with her…

The 101st Annual Meeting of my primary professional society, the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), convened in Washington, DC, on Saturday and will run through Wednesday, April 21. The theme for this year’s meeting is “Conquering Cancer Through Discovery Research,” and focuses strongly on the translation of discoveries into cancer treatments. Although the Eyjafjallajökull…

Last July we wrote about the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing and spoke of Buzz Aldrin’s autobiography about his battle with alcoholism in the years following. The post drew a comment from a reader who I’ve renamed “Anon.” Thank you so much for this post. I am a recovering drug addict and…

This post is the third in a series on the origin and history of HeLa S3 cells. The first post details how I came about to ask this question when launching my independent research laboratory. The second post details the life and careers of the legendary physician-scientist pioneer, Dr. Florence Rena Sabin. Today, we take…

This post is the second in a series on the origin and history of HeLa S3 cells. The first post can be found here. In this post, we discuss the life and careers (yes, careers) of the remarkable physician-scientist, Florence Rena Sabin. “Too bad you’re not a boy, you would have made a good doctor.”…

When I first started my independent academic laboratory in 1992, it was in a brand new facility across the parking lot from a then 40-year-old building named in honor of the woman to the right. I took on a big teaching load from day one and while I had some cash left from the $50,000…