Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for July, 2007

Tet Zoo picture of the day # 25

My job at Impossible Pictures finished last week (though I am still doing the odd day here and there and am likely to go back to them in the future). Sigh, so much for digging myself out of that immense financial pit I’m still in. Anyway, today I start work on a new job involving……

Tet Zoo picture of the day # 24

Hello loyal readers: I know you’re still there. Yet again I can’t resist the lure of posting something new when I really shouldn’t. Most of you, I’m sure, think that archaeopterygids – the archaic basal birds of Late Jurassic Germany (and Portugal too if Weigert’s (1995) identification of isolated teeth is correct) – are long…

The latest acquisitions

Just a very quick post before I get back to work… Regular Tet Zoo readers will know that – for my shame – I’m a pathological collector of toy/model animals [for more, go to the ver 1 articles here and here]. One of the things I did over the weekend was acquire some fantastic new…

It isn’t every day that your friends make the cover of Science magazine. Belated congrats to my friend Randy Irmis and his colleagues Sterling Nesbitt, Kevin Padian and others for their neat work on the dinosauromorph assemblage of Hayden Quarry, New Mexico (Irmis et al. 2007). Exciting stuff. Why? Well…

Long-time blog readers will know that I am atrocious at keeping promises. And I will confess that part of the reason for titling an article ‘Goodbye Tetrapod Zoology‘ was to cause a burst of panic, a rash of visitors (the strategy didn’t really work: look at the counter… no spike on the graph). In seriousness,…

Goodbye Tetrapod Zoology

You all know that I’m just dying to publish those articles on biarmosuchians, dinocephalians and edaphosaurids, not to mention the dinoceratans, astrapotheres, pantodonts, pantolestans and nesophontids that I’ve been busy with lately. Then there are the stem-group monstersaurian lizards, the palaeophiids, the miniature ground sloths, the meiolaniids, the giant iguanas; and those long-overdue articles on…

Among the many, many groups I have yet to cover on Tet Zoo are stem-group synapsids: Synapsida is the tetrapod clade that includes mammals and all of their relatives, and there is a long tradition of referring to non-mammalian synapsids as ‘mammal-like reptiles’ (other names include protomammals and paramammals). Because synapsids are not part of…

Hooray: another of those articles that I’ve been promising to publish for weeks and weeks. Thanks mostly to the importance of the species in the international pet trade, the Green iguana Iguana iguana is typically imagined as a rather uninspiring lizard that sits around on branches all day long, occasionally munching on salad or sitting…

Tet Zoo picture of the day # 23

Today I had good reason to send to Markus Bühler – my good friend and an avid Tet Zoo supporter – several images of entelodonts. What the hell, I thought, why not share one of these images with the rest of you. This awesome life-sized model depicts the Oligocene-Miocene North American entelodont Daeodon (formerly better…

Tet Zoo picture of the day # 22

This photo depicts an assortment of hominid species, including most of the australopithecines and Homo ergaster (front left, facing camera). A neanderthal is at top right. The reconstructions (obviously, these are photos of the models) were produced by Wolfgang Schnaubelt and Nina Kieser in co-operation with GEO-magazine; an exhibition displaying the models opened in 1998…