Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for November, 2007

Red bats

Only time for a picture-of-the-day today, and this neat picture shows an Eastern red bat Lasiurus borealis, a mid-sized vesper bat (wingspan c. 300 mm) that occurs across most of eastern North America, some of northern South America, and parts of the Caribbean (in 2004 an individual was reported from north-east Alberta, which I presume…

That weird little face was, indeed, that of a turtle – but it wasn’t that of a matamata Chelus fimbriatus, it was instead that of a softshell turtle (a trionychid), and specifically that of a narrow-headed softshell Chitra indica (though read on). Well done Lars, Johannes and Emile, and particularly Hai-Ren. Chitra has to be…

Its cute little face

Late in the evening I sat in an airport lounge, finally reading Robert Twigger’s book on python hunting, my head full of Robert Appleby’s legacy, fossil giraffes, giant mustelids, and the song from the end of Portal. I thought about the wolfhounds I’d seen, the bullfinches, stock doves and plovers; the bones we’d found; the…

I’m going away for a little while. I leave you with this nice picture of a male Fallow deer Dama dama, taken from Neil Phillips’ collection of UK wildlife photos (and used with his permission)…

Homage to The Velvet Claw (part II)

On to more of my thoughts about the TV series The Velvet Claw (part I is here). In the previous article, I discussed the art and animation used in the series, all of which was really quite good and very interesting in often featuring fairly obscure creatures…

Homage to The Velvet Claw (part I)

Those of us interested in the same subject often tend to have experienced the same sort of things. If you share my interests (as you probably do, given that you’re here), you’ve probably watched a lot of Attenborough on TV. You’ve probably been to at least one of the bigger natural history museums of your…

Homage to The Velvet Claw (teaser)

If you’re like me, you’ll know the TV series, and/or the book, well…

Now, I’ve described quite a few isolated dinosaur bones in my time. And I’ve been involved in some pretty hectic media whirlwindy events (‘Angloposeidon’, aka ‘Europe’s largest sauropod’, was huge news: see here, as was Eotyrannus). But I’ve never been associated with any PR exercise that was as well orchestrated and successful as the event…

The world’s most amazing sauropod

By now you might have heard the thrilling news that Britain has a brand-new sauropod dinosaur: it’s an animal that I’ve obliquely alluded to many times here at Tet Zoo (since February 2006 in fact), and its study and publication have been many months – in fact years – in the making. Yes, it’s (arguably)…

Giraffe vs plane

While googling for Tetrapod Zoology recently (how vain) I came across a bunch of interesting giraffe images, most of which I’ll be recycling here at some stage in the future. I don’t know anything about the history of the photo shown here; it looks genuine and I think it speaks for itself. It seems to…