Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for January, 2008

Long time readers will, I’m sure, recall Tet Zoo’s role as whistle-blower back in April 2007. The article that started all the trouble – The armadillodile diaries, a story of science ethics – was posted here. Well, as you’ll know if you’ve seen today’s Nature, a new article by Rex Dalton brings this story to…

An affection for snapping turtles

Will and I looked at some really awesome creatures on our recent visit to the Blue Reef Aquarium at Southsea (Portsmouth, UK)… but most of them weren’t tetrapods so I won’t be blogging about them. Sturgeons, wobbegongs, remoras, horseshoe crabs, four-eyed fish, Pacific giant octopus, moray eels. I actually spent ages trying to get a…

Titan-hawks and other super-raptors

Keeping promises isn’t always easy, but – following what is hopefully a forgiveable hiatus – here we get back to that short series on obscure island-dwelling, recently extinct animals. It started with a map of the Caribbean. Then we got through (some of the) island otters and canids, and then more of the canids… the…

2007 – Tet Zoo’s second year of operation – has come and gone. The previous article was a brief personal review of the year, and here’s more of the same (sort of) if you can handle it…

January 21st 2008 was Tet Zoo’s second birthday, but due to its clashing with the launch of the EDGE amphibian site I didn’t have the chance to write about it. So, better late than never, I’m doing that now. It’s time to reminiscence on a year gone by, on a year when so much happened…

Birds vs planes

Time to resort to posting images, with minimal use of text, once more. Previously we had giraffes vs planes: these pictures – which are widely available on the web and unfortunately don’t come with any details* – pretty much speak for themselves. In the image at top, an unfortunate seabird has clearly met its demise…

A major global conservation effort, aiming to bring to better attention the chronic plight of the world’s amphibian species, was launched at the start of this year. You might have heard of it: the Year of the Frog movement. And, today, a second project aimed at conserving the world’s endangered amphibians launches: the EDGE amphibian…

Those of you with particularly good memories might recall the little references I’ve been making here and there to a ‘big, personally-relevant publication’, and those asides to new papers about pleurodires and enantiornithines. Following horrific delays (caused by amphibians, dinosaur growth rates, ichthyosaurs and conferences) I am, finally, pleased to announce that Cambridge University Press’…

Or – alternative title to this article – ‘It will be the best conference of all time’ (no hyperbole at all). Do you like dinosaurs? Are you particularly interested in our changing ideas about dinosaurs, about key discoveries and concepts, or about the evolution of our ideas, reconstructions and theories about dinosaurs? If the answer…

It seems that this story is already all over the internet – I would have posted on it sooner this morning but was busy with amphibians! Anyway… back in 2005 Mary Schweitzer and colleagues dropped a bombshell into the world of dinosaur palaeontology: they reported the discovery of medullary bone within a Tyrannosaurus rex specimen…