Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for March, 2008

Tet Zoo needs you!

I’ve mentioned on and off lately that Tet Zoo the book is now go. The manuscript is complete, and right now (when not working on other things) I’m dealing with the editorial tidying-up. The book won’t, I’m sorry to say, be anything technically new: it’s simply a compilation of the better articles from Tet Zoo…

Continuing the theme of discussing ‘things in the news’, we arrive, finally, at dinosaurs. The previous ‘late news’ pieces looked at fossil anurans and pterosaurs, and assorted mammals. So what news has been announced recently-ish in the world of dinosaurs? Well, frankly, there are always so many newly announced dinosaurs that it’s difficult to keep…

Maybe it’s because I write too much, but I am frequently surprised and sometimes a little freaked out at the strange coincidences that have so often cropped up during my time here at Tet Zoo. Long-time readers will recall the several occasions when we’ve looked at hypothetical intelligent dinosaurs: it started back in 2006 with…

The horror that is LOLSAUROPODS

Dr David Hone is well known for many scientific achievements. For the description of the new rhynchosaur Fodonyx (Hone & Benton 2007a). For his papers on Cope’s rule and macroevolutionary trends in archosaurs (Hone & Benton 2005, Hone et al. 2005). For his PhD work on the phylogenetic position of pterosaurs (Hone & Benton 2007b).…

As explained in the previous article, here’s another by-now-outdated effort to report on stuff that’s been published recently, or recently-ish. This time: mammals.

It was Beelzebufo that finally made up my mind. Long-time readers will have noticed that I generally fail to discuss the exciting stuff that’s being announced in the news, even when it’s very much relevant to the Tet Zoo remit. Indeed some of you have even commented upon this fact. What’s my excuse for this?…

Regular readers will know that I am an unashamed fan of non-standard theories, aka fringe theories or whacky theories, and of course we looked just recently at the haematotherm theory. Doubtless you’ve all heard of the aquatic ape hypothesis (AAH): that strangely popular notion which promotes the idea that modern humans owe their distinctive features…

Belated happy birthday AAB!

Yes, the globally renowned internet phenomenon that is Ask A Biologist had its official first birthday on Friday 14th. All the AAB contributors got together and had a massive champagne lunch to celebrate…

In the previous article (required reading) we looked at European leopards. But the leopard wasn’t the only big spotted Panthera species that lived in Europe during the Pleistocene: it was joined by a second, far less well known animal: Panthera gombaszoegensis (originally Leo gombaszoegensis Kretzoi, 1938). This cat seems to have been very jaguar-like and…

So, on to the contents of my BCiB talk (see previous article for preamble). We began by looking at Homotherium latidens, sometimes called the scimitar cat, scimitar-toothed cat or dirk-toothed cat. H. latidens is one of several Homotherium species that inhabited North America, Eurasia and Africa during the Pleistocene: the different species varied in body…