Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for April, 2008

Welcome to the third and final part of my write-up of the CEE functional anatomy meeting: for part I go here, and for part II here. Here’s where we wrap things up, but let’s get through the last of the talks: those on tuataras, and yet more on primates…

More recollections from the CEE Functional Anatomy meeting: part I is here. We looked in the previous article at Robin Crompton’s overview of primate locomotor ecology and evolution, Renate Weller’s overview of new technologies, John Hutchinson’s work on dinosaur biomechanics, and Jenny Clack’s new look at Ichthyostega [adjacent image is Jaime Chirinos’s Thylacoleo restoration]. Still…

At a vertebrate palaeontology workshop held in Maastricht in 1998, some colleagues and I sat in a bar, lamenting the fact that nobody cared about anatomy any more, and that funding bodies and academia in general were only interested in genetics. Given the poor to non-existent coverage that anatomy gets in many biology courses and…

The Great Goswell Copse Zootoca

The unusual fossil mammal skull posted here yesterday was, of course, that of the astrapotheriid astrapothere Astrapotherium magnum, as many as you said. But I’m a bit surprised that more people didn’t get it straight away, given that astrapotheres were covered and covered again at Tet Zoo only a couple of months ago. However, I…

Functional anatomy ALIVE

Yesterday I attended the Centre for Evolution and Ecology workshop ‘Modern Approaches to Functional Anatomy’, held at the Natural History Museum (and organised by the Royal Veterinary College’s John Hutchinson). Whoah: what a meeting…

You might have noticed very little/no activity here over the past two weeks: partly this is because I’m very busy (preparing for Dinosaurs – A Historical Perspective, among other things), but it’s also because I currently have no internet access at home. Sigh. In an effort to add something new, here’s the long-planned, third and…

If you’ve been with Tet Zoo since the beginning (early 2006), you will know that, again and again and again and again, we’ve been coming back to the fact that large eagles, like Golden eagles Aquila chrysaetos, can and do kill surprisingly large mammalian prey (weighing over 100 kg in cases). And note that can…

Before I begin, let me say: yay Raeticodactylus. Would say more but haven’t had time (plus I’ve had no internet access for the last few days). Last year Dave Martill and I published part 1 of our review of the British dinosaur fauna (Naish & Martill 2007). While several published lists provide overviews of Britain’s…

Here’s that cute porcupine photo I mentioned (I think). It shows a group of Crested porcupines Hystrix cristata photographed at Marwell Zoological Park…. awww, look at the little baby. Many other blogs would stop there. But ooooh no, that’s not how we do things round here. Here are some little known factoids about Old World…

Well done everyone who had a go at identifying the lizards from yesterday. Dead easy, as both species are highly distinctive and easy to identify (and both were previously mentioned in the Tropiquaria article)…