Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for April, 2008

Desktop herping

It’s going to be a busy month, what with the run-up to ‘Dinosaurs – A Historical Perspective’, and other stuff. So I regret I haven’t had time to knock up any new articles: but hey, I know you don’t mind what with the recent ‘mammals are amphisbaenians’ article, and the panda stuff. So…

The once mighty red panda empire

In the previous article we looked at the discovery of the Red panda Ailurus fulgens, and also at some aspects of its biology and distribution. There’s so much I didn’t cover: Red panda physiology is bizarrely interesting, for example. In this article we’re going to look at the Red panda’s fossil relatives. As I implied…

They sit there, mostly curled up, mostly asleep, high up in tree-tops, sometimes chewing on bits of plants. But little known is that, deep within their furry little heads, they harbour an unknown desire: to take over the world…

The wahs are coming!

This picture borrowed from wikipedia. Full story later (about wahs, not wikipedia).

As I’ve mentioned previously, ‘Dinosaurs – A Historical Perspective’ happens on May 6th and 7th: pretty soon! This two-day conference will be held at the Geological Society’s Burlington House in Piccadilly (London), and we now have all the required information available online: if you’re thinking of attending it is mandatory that you check out the…

Among the most controversial and remarkable of living tetrapods are the bizarre amphisbaenians: a group of fossorial, long-bodied carnivorous animals with reduced or absent limbs, spade-shaped or bullet-shaped skulls strongly modified for burrowing, and an annulated body where distinct, regularly arranged transverse segments give the animals a worm-like appearance. Until recently it was generally thought…