Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for February, 2009

Struthio‘s pectoral weirdness

Inspired by the kiwi weirdness looked at here recently, I thought I’d focus on some other ratite skeletal stuff. But the idea here isn’t to identify the animal. This is obviously the skeleton of an ostrich Struthio camelus. The question for you is a simple one: what’s going on with the pectoral girdle? What makes…

More musings on dinosaury things from January 2009. For the back-story you’ll need to see part 1 and part 2, both of which are on theropods (and, specifically, on maniraptorans). This time we look at ornithischians…

Yes, it was a kiwi

Better late than never… what was the identity of that unusual string of vertebrae I featured here however-many-days-ago? Most of you realised – correctly – that it was the neck of a bird, and several of you guessed moa. This wasn’t a bad guess, but it wasn’t the right one. The correct answer was given…

An annoying hiatus

Those of you who notice such things might have wondered where I’ve been over the last few days: after all, I’m now pretty much in the habit of posting to Tet Zoo every day. I’ve been ‘absent’ due to internet problems (now resolved, for the time being at least)… though, yeah, I’ve got other excuses…

More dinosaury stuff from January 2009: for the background story, please see part I. Last time we looked at therizinosauroids. Alvarezsaurids have also been the subject of much discussion lately. This is thanks to Ceratonykus oculatus, a new taxon from the Upper Cretaceous of Mongolia (Alifanov & Barsbold 2009). Alvarezsaurids have had a slightly confusing…

First of all, many many thanks to everyone (both here and at SV-POW!) for the congrats regarding baby Emma. I am, shall we say, a little tired right now, but as you’ll know if you’ve visited SV-POW! this morning, the good news as goes blogging is that I’ve been able to get lots of stuff…

Hello Emma Naish!

I am happy to report that, at 9-43am this morning (Saturday 7th), Mrs Toni Naish gave birth to baby Emma. Things started round about 5am and, needless to say, the entire day has been taken up with baby duties. Some of you might know that southern England has been badly affected over the past week…

Let’s have some fun. Try and identify this tetrapod: and you have to get it down to genus. Good luck.

Ode to Titanoboa

No time for anything new: too busy desperately trying to make money. So I’d like to bring your attention to Head et al.’s (2009) paper on the amazing new gargantuan snake Titanoboa cerrejonensis from the Palaeocene of Colombia, and also to Ed Yong’s fine discussion of the paper at Not Exactly Rocket Science. Surprisingly, perhaps,…

In 2006, the second series of the BBC’s Planet Earth was screened. If you saw the series, you’ll know that it included a lot of awesome stuff. One thing that got an awful lot of people talking was the amazing footage – included as part of episode 2 (‘Great Plains’) – showing the elephant-killing lions…