Tetrapod Zoology

Sneak peek

This work comes out in a few months though, as you can guess, I have my own advance copy already…

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Much more in due time. As before, see if you can identify any of the other works visible (just about) on the shelves. Some are easier than others!

UPDATE: Well done if you had a go at guessing the books visible in the shot above. Yes, that’s The Dinosauria (softback 1992) and Paul’s Dinosaurs of the Air at far left, with Matt Wedel’s 2007 PhD thesis Postcranial Pneumaticity in Dinosaurs and the Origin of the Avian Lung sandwiched in between. The slim, white and blue volume to the left of Matt’s thesis is Zbigniew Szyndlar and Jean-Claude Rage’s 2003 Non-erycine Booidea from the Oligocene and Miocene of Europe. On top of this pile, we can see the spine of David Norman’s The Prehistoric World of the Dinosaur, and the spine of the little Eichstätt Museum volume Drachen der Lüfte. The purple volume is the NHS The Pregnancy Book and the thick volume underneath it is the multi-authored Encyclopedia of Dinosaurs, notable for its many Franczak and Paul pictures, and certainly not for its text. Over on the right, Pilleri’s The Cetacea of the Italian Pliocene, Proceedings of the 5th Symposium of the Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution (yes, the one from Beijing 2000; Zhonghe Zhou once gave it to me), and John Burton’s Snakes: an Illustrated Guide are obvious. The thick green volume is Angela Kirton’s (still unpublished) PhD thesis A Review of British Upper Jurassic Ichthyosaurs.

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As correctly noted by AnJaCo, The Great Dinosaur Discoveries is sitting on top of two volumes of Handbuch der Paläoherpetologie: Steel’s Saurischia volume is on the top, and Reisz’s Pelycosauria is beneath it. Towards the left, the yellow belongs to Simone Maganuco et al.’s new monograph An exquisite specimen of Edingerella madagascariensis (Temnospondyli) from the Lower Triassic of NW Madagascar: cranial anatomy, phylogeny, and restoration [shown here, with another bit of the same bookshelf]. I still haven’t thanked Simone for sending this: it’s a very impressive piece of work! Finally, the books in the little pile at bottom left are just about impossible to identify. The turquoise corner visible at the top belongs to Colbert’s Men and Dinosaurs and the very top of the front cover of LeBlond and Bousfield’s Cadborosaurus: Survivor from the Deep is also visible. Hong Kong Amphibians and Reptiles is also in the pile, but unidentifiable.

Clearly… my library is in total disarray right now. It really is: books are scattered all over the house, in all the rooms. I had to lose my office when Emma was born.

Coming next: Inside Nature’s Giants!

Comments

  1. #1 Mo Hassan
    July 25, 2009

    Can’t wait… the cover’s different from the one on Amazon… I prefer this one.

  2. #2 AnJaCo
    July 25, 2009

    Is that orange pub in the foreground one of the Handbuch der Paleoherpetologie series?

  3. #3 Michael Ogden Erickson
    July 25, 2009

    I can’t wait to get this book! Oh, and the book on the far left is the first edition of The Dinosauria.

  4. #4 Michael Ogden Erickson
    July 25, 2009

    I also see Gregory S. Paul’s (wonderful) Dinosaurs of the Air.

  5. #5 ech
    July 25, 2009

    Dude! You got an advance copy of “Proceedings of the 5th Symposium of the Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution”? The one in Beijing?? You are so lucky.

  6. #6 Brian
    July 25, 2009

    I can see either ‘The Big Cats and their fossil relatives’ or ‘Dogs: Their fossil relatives and evolutionary history” in the background.

  7. #7 Bob Michaels
    July 25, 2009

    Looking foward to it

  8. #8 tai haku
    July 25, 2009

    Is that ‘The Dinosaur Heresies” at far left?

  9. #9 Rob
    July 25, 2009

    I am looking forward to seeing this book.

  10. #10 Michael Ogden Erickson
    July 25, 2009

    “Is that ‘The Dinosaur Heresies” at far left?”

    Nope, it’s the first edition of The Dinosauria.

  11. #11 Michael Bogan
    July 25, 2009

    My favorite book in the pic is just to the left. It is the Postcranial Pneumaticity in Dinosaurs and the Origin of the Avain Lung by Mr. Wedel who is the graduate roommate of my mentor Julian Hilliard. Don’t have that book yet but I soon will!!! And Mr. Naish’s book will be an acquisition soon there after!

  12. #12 Raymond Minton
    July 25, 2009

    With a name like “The Great Dinosaur Discoveries”, this should be a long book! I know the book on the left is “the Dinosauria”, but I’m afraid I can’t make out any of the others. And isn’t that a Velociraptor on the cover of your book, Darren (a real one, not the Jurassic Park counterfeit?) Looks like a great read, good luck with it!

  13. #13 Nathan Myers
    July 25, 2009

    I can just about make out “POSTCRANIAL PNEUMATICITY IN DINOSAURS AND THE QUEEN OF THE ANTHILLING”. Strange book, I’ll wager.

  14. #14 Michael Ogden Erickson
    July 25, 2009

    “And isn’t that a Velociraptor on the cover of your book, Darren”

    It’s actually Tsaagan.

  15. #15 Alan Kellogg
    July 25, 2009

    Wasn’t Tsaagan a famous tskeeptic?

  16. #16 David Marjanović
    July 26, 2009

    the book on the far left is the first edition of The Dinosauria.

    The paperback edition, 1992, unfortunately but understandably not updated. The hardcover edition is from 1990 and is a big black brick, much like Matt Wedel’s thesis which (as mentioned above) stands right next to it.

  17. #17 McGowen
    July 26, 2009

    “”Dude! You got an advance copy of “Proceedings of the 5th Symposium of the Society of Avian Paleontology and Evolution”? The one in Beijing?? You are so lucky.”” Wow that is the nerdiest thing I have ever heard in my life. I mean that in a good way.

  18. #18 Matt Wedel
    July 26, 2009

    Mr. Wedel who is the graduate roommate of my mentor Julian Hilliard

    Whoa, dude! How is Julian these days? For those of you who don’t know him, Julian Hilliard is a great guy to go herping with, fishing, digging up dinosaurs, dissecting cadavers…pretty much the compleat zoologist. We used to go seine the local creeks and split the catch; he’d feed his half to his caiman and I’d feed mine to my snapping turtle. Good times!

  19. #19 rajita
    July 26, 2009

    Good jacket. That picture of the guy posing with the sauropod limb is impressive !

  20. #20 Darren Naish
    July 26, 2009

    Ok, no more guesses on the books – answers just added to post above. And thanks for positive comments about Naish (2009).

  21. #21 Dartian
    July 27, 2009

    Darren:

    On top of this pile, we can see the spine of David Norman’s The Prehistoric World of the Dinosaur

    Ah, I was wondering about that one. I first thought that it was his good ol’ classic Dinosaur! but the dust jacket didn’t match that of any edition that I know of, and the title’s obligatory exclamation mark was missing.

    Incidentally, David Norman, as Darren and I know, is not a septuagenarian (sorry for the in-joke).

    Clearly… my library is in total disarray right now. It really is: books are scattered all over the house, in all the rooms.

    I’m curious; what’s the total number of biology books in the Naish household? Do you keep track?

    Oh, and congratulations for the book from me too!

  22. #22 Darren Naish
    July 27, 2009

    Thanks for congrats, Dartian. Total number of books: I have no idea. I just asked Toni and she said “Oh, I dunno, millions”. If I have time (which I don’t) I’ll count them later today.

  23. #23 John Scanlon, FCD
    July 27, 2009

    The slim, white and blue volume to the left of Matt’s thesis is Zbigniew Szyndlar and Jean-Claude Rage’s 2003 Non-erycine Booidea from the Oligocene and Miocene of Europe.

    Of course it is! – though the absence of any text on the spine makes it an easy volume to lose on the shelf (I remedied that for my copy, when it eventually turned up again).

    I can’t see anything else there that’s also on my shelf – I haven’t even been able to obtain Worthy and Holdaway’s Lost World of the Moa.

  24. #24 Craig York
    July 27, 2009

    What?! No Copies of The Hunt For The Buru?

    🙂 Sorry. Congratulations on the first of many memorable
    tomes! ( One hopes, anyway. )

  25. #25 Michael Bogan
    July 27, 2009

    Whoa, dude! How is Julian these days?

    Julian is doing good. Still in Oklahoma at OCCC dissecting cadavers. I will pass on a hello next time I see him. The summer semester just ended, so he is off on one of his backpacking trips again. We still go out and do most of that when we have time, but not too many digs. I think Matt found all of the dinosaurs in Oklahoma. 🙂

  26. #26 Ben Speers-Roesch
    July 27, 2009

    I see a copy of The Lost World of the Moa that has now graced two of the most fantastic private natural history libraries (although one is definitely more oriented to non-tetrapod vertebrates, mainly because they’re so much cooler! 😉

  27. #27 Darren Naish
    July 27, 2009

    Hey Ben – where is this second fantastic private natural history library of which you speak?

    And do I still owe you money for that copy of The Lost World of the Moa? 🙂

  28. #28 Rose
    July 28, 2009

    Congratulations on the new book – looks good.

  29. #29 Ben Speers-Roesch
    July 30, 2009

    At my place! Recently I’ve inherited a lot of fantastic and rare books too, from a friend who had the best library I’ve ever seen.

    For Lost World of the Moa, I’ll get a beer out of you someday!

    I also have a copy of Field Guide to Frogs of Borneo for you, if you want it. It’s the first edition though.

    Congratulations on the new book from UC Press!

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