Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for January, 2010

Ahh, life is sweet

I have to take a break. I may be gone for some time… I may not. Here are some cool photos.

2009, a year of Tet Zooery

So, if you read the previous article, you’ll know that we’re here because Tet Zoo was four years old on January 21st. In that article, I got as far as discussing blog-relevant events that happened up to the end of May or so. Time to crack on…

Tet Zoo = 4 years old today

Today is January 21st which means, believe it or don’t, that it’s Tet Zoo’s birthday, the 4th no less. Holy crap… have I really been blogging for four years? Yikes, and there is still so much to do, so little ground I’ve covered. This is despite more than 635 (count ‘em) Tet Zoo articles here…

What to make of the Yowie?

Like many people interested in cryptozoology (the study of animals – or alleged animals – known only from anectodal evidence), I’m of the opinion that the Australian Yowie is one of the most problematic of mystery beasts. It is, in fact, so ridiculous and inconvenient that it’s difficult to take seriously. As if sasquatch, yeti…

Giant African softshells – wow!

If you’re a long-time Tet Zoo reader you might remember the article about giant Asian softshell turtles from November 2007. That article – which mostly focused on the several Chitra species – was colourfully titled ‘The goat-eating hot water bottle turtles’. As you may recall, the ‘goat-eating’ bit was inspired by a comment made in…

Tone and I recently went to see Avatar. I’ve been reading up on the movie for months and was really looking forward to seeing it. I mostly liked it, though did think it was a bit clich├ęd and predictable. But I’m not here to talk about storylines and plot devices… you want to know about…

Help identify the snake. Please.

Can you identify this South American snake? The photo comes courtesy of Paul Nicholas, who spotted the snake (which was about 1 m long) while it was crossing a river below the Great Falls and King George Falls in the (mostly unexplored) upper Essequibo region of Guyana. The strange-looking lumps are water drops. Paul’s guides…

Today see the launch of an outstanding new website devoted entirely to pterosaurs, the flying reptiles of the Mesozoic. What makes the site different from many specialist sources on the internet is that it was created, written and designed by specialists in the field. As such, it should prove an invaluable resource. I’ll try and…

A stocky, medium-sized (up to 2 m long) and poorly known elapid with notably small eyes, Micropechis ikaheka – the Small-eyed or Ikaheka snake – is the only recognised member of its genus*. It’s unique to New Guinea and some of the surrounding islands [adjacent image from Warrell et al. (1996)].

Biggest sauropod ever (part…. II)

By popular demand… it’s the second part of the old, old, old (ver 1) article I wrote in 2006 on the obscure and poorly known mega-sauropod Amphicoelias fragillimus. Be sure to read part I first. So, A. fragillimus was described in 1878 on the basis of an incomplete but enormous dorsal vertebra and the distal…