Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for November, 2010

When you discover something new on the internet, you usually find – minutes or hours later – that everyone else already knows about it, and you’re just late to the party. And so it is here. But what the hell. Petya Cosmos recently alerted me to this hilarious, and interesting, video. The drama, the suspense,…

As you’ll know if you have your fingers on the throbbing pulse of dinosaur-related publications, the massive, incredibly pricey volume published by the Geological Society of London, and resulting from the 2008 meeting History of Dinosaurs and Other Fossil Saurians, now exists in dead-tree form. It’s titled Dinosaurs and Other Extinct Saurians: A Historical Perspective…

I’ve been ill, and pressing deadlines for book chapters and other projects have kept me busy. An inability to post stuff on Tet Zoo always frustrates me, as there’s just so much Tet Zoo-relevant stuff to get through. And, on that note: I must have said on many occasions that there are whole tetrapod groups,…

Everybody knows that camels are weird. As you’ll know if you’ve been keeping an eye on SV-POW! lately, we’ve recently been quite taken with their necks. But it’s not just camel’s necks that are weird. Here, we embark on another look at the sometimes bizarre pouches, pockets and sacs present in certain mammals, most of…

I recently posted an updated version of the ‘Science of Godzilla’ article, and what a great success it was. But I’m kicking myself, because I totally forgot something else I should have mentioned: Tracy L. Ford recently had cause to produce a number of anatomical drawings of Zilla (aka GINO*/Deanzilla/Fraudzilla), the monster bipedal reptile that…

My three-part series on the ‘explosion of Iguanodon‘ is now complete and up on the Scientific American guest blog: part I is here, part II here, and part III here. Part III wraps things up and looks briefly at the social inertia that has held back our understanding of Iguanodon sensu lato, and also at…

Part I of a three-part series on the ‘explosion of Iguanodon‘ starts today at the Scientific American guest blog. This first part covers the background before looking at Altirhinus, Owenodon, Mantellisaurus and Dollodon – and there’s lots more to come. Please head on over, and be sure to do your commenting there, not here. Thanks.…

Time for a little game. What does this photo represent? Can you work out what happened here? One clue: the skeleton belonged to a large mammal. Sorry the pic is in black-and-white and a bit fuzzy, it’s the best version of the image I have (a colour version exists somewhere – please do pass it…

Having written (briefly) about the turtle-like shelled placodont Henodus chelyops, it’s as good a time as any to provide some more information. For starters, here’s a close-up photo (kindly provided by Markus B├╝hler) showing one of the grooves in the left lower jaw. These gutter-like structures (reportedly) contained a baleen-like apparatus, possibly used in filter-feeding…

Back in July 2009 I wrote an article on what little I knew (and had read) about lightning strikes and animal deaths [in composite image below, lightning image by John R. Southern; Angolan giraffe Giraffa camelopardalis angolensis by Hans Hillewaert. Both from wikipedia]. As discussed therein, there are a few cases on record where African…