Tetrapod Zoology

Archives for April, 2011

A group of serotine-like bats that occur in North America, Cuba, tropical Africa, Asia and Australasia have often been grouped together in a ‘tribe’ called Nycticeini (or Nycticeiini: both spellings are used in the bat literature and I’m unsure which has proper precedence). Tate (1942) used this name for an assemblage of species grouped together…

Once upon a time, a huge variety of small to very small vesper bats – basically all of those that possess a simple tragus, a shortish face, two pairs of upper incisors and two upper and two lower premolars – were lumped together as the pipistrelles. You don’t have to have a detailed or expert…

Vesper bats. Well done with sticking with it all so far – I have lots of non-bat stuff I want to cover, but (for reasons soon to be explained) I need to get this series finished. With this article – part XI in the series (XI) – we are not at the end. But we…

About 12 species of big-eared Australasian bats are known as the, err, Australian big-eared bats and New Guinean bats. More formally, they are the Nyctophilus species. They’re also known from some of the islands that surround New Guinea (like the Lesser Sundas), and also from New Caledonia (an endemic New Caledonian species, N. nebulosus, was…

Hey, if anyone out there is bored with the bats, just gimme a shout. If you’re loving it, say so, and urge me to post more – there’s still a lot to come! Yes, welcome once again to the vesper bat series: for previous installments see the list of links at the bottom of this…

Now that all the fuss about modern-day sauropod dinosaurs has died down, we can get back to the serious business of vesper bats (incidentally, I do plan to cover the mokele-mbembe – in serious fashion – at some point in history). For previous parts in the vesper bats series, please look at the links below.…

Science meets the Mokele-Mbembe!

PLEASE NOTE (ADDED 2012): IT SHOULD BE EXTREMELY OBVIOUS THAT THIS ARTICLE IS AN APRIL FOOL’S JOKE, NOT A DESCRIPTION OF REAL RESEARCH. Today sees the publication of what is surely the century’s most significant zoological discovery. After decades of searching, Africa’s mystery Congolese swamp monster, the Mokele-Mbembe, has been discovered – it is a…