crurotarsans

Tetrapod Zoology

Category archives for crurotarsans

We all know that many birds feed their young. Nowadays, many of us are also familiar with the idea that hadrosaurs and other dinosaurs might also have fed their young. Far less well known is the possibility that crocodilians may do this too, at least sometimes. As with those fruit-eating alligators, I have John Brueggen…

Do you remember the photo – provided courtesy of Colin McHenry – showing a variety of crocodilian skulls? I published it in an article on the CEE Functional Anatomy meeting, and here it is again. The challenge was to try and identify the largest skull. Suggestions included Saltwater croc Crocodylus porosus, outsized American croc C.…

Alligators eat fruit

A few years ago Brito et al. (2002) published a brief but very interesting little paper in which they reported frugivory in Broad-snouted caimans Caiman latirostris. Two captive Brazilian animals were observed and photographed feeding on the fruit of Philodendron selloum [photo here is Fig. 1 from Brito et al. (2002)]. They later offered fruit…

Aetogate: so where are we now?

The silence must have been deafening. As – hopefully – everybody knows, during 2007 Spencer Lucas and colleagues at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science (NMMNHS) were charged with intellectual theft, of pre-empting the writings of colleagues, and of publishing on material without getting an OK from those based at the repository…

While googling for astrapothere images recently I came across the image used here: wow! This is a life-sized reconstruction of the gigantic Miocene alligatoroid Purussaurus, first named in 1892 for P. brasiliensis from the Upper Miocene Solimões Formation of Brazil. Most of the salient features that are diagnostic for Purussaurus can be seen in the…

Long time readers will, I’m sure, recall Tet Zoo’s role as whistle-blower back in April 2007. The article that started all the trouble – The armadillodile diaries, a story of science ethics – was posted here. Well, as you’ll know if you’ve seen today’s Nature, a new article by Rex Dalton brings this story to…