from the archives

Tetrapod Zoology

Category archives for from the archives

Another article on babirusas – yaay! Like many (but not all) pigs, babirusas are omnivorous, and are said to eat invertebrates whenever they find them. They have also been reported to eat fish on occasion, to catch small mammals, and even to catch and eat the juveniles of other babirusas (Leus & Morgan 1995). They…

More on babirusas! Go here for part I. While babirusas look pig-like and are classified as part of Suidae, they’re distinctive and unusual [image above from wikipedia]. Combining rather slender legs with a barrel-shaped body, they can exceed 1 m in length and have a shoulder height of 65-80 cm. Some individuals weigh as much…

In the interests of recycling old material from Tet Zoo ver 1, I present… yes, a whole series of articles devoted to one of the most unusual and remarkable of hoofed mammals. Come on, we all love babirusas. If you’ve been with Tet Zoo from the beginning, none of what’s to follow will be new…

Biggest sauropod ever (part…. II)

By popular demand… it’s the second part of the old, old, old (ver 1) article I wrote in 2006 on the obscure and poorly known mega-sauropod Amphicoelias fragillimus. Be sure to read part I first. So, A. fragillimus was described in 1878 on the basis of an incomplete but enormous dorsal vertebra and the distal…

Hope you had a good Christmas – I did! Here’s an old article from Tet Zoo ver 1, apologies if you recall it from its first airing in 2006. The article is now a bit dated – sorry about that (I’ve added one or two new bits). Even if you’re not an expert on dinosaurs,…

The recent article about Meller’s duck Anas melleri inspired me to recycle my ver 1 article about another of Madagascar’s endemic ducks, the Madagascar pochard Aythya innotata [male shown below]. Meller’s duck is endangered, with a global population of between 3000 and 5000, but the Madagascar pochard is in an even worse position: in fact,…

We flightless primates

Some time during the last several hours (while I was asleep), Tet Zoo reached the three million hits mark. Yes, three million hits in two years (Tet Zoo ver 2 was launched on Jan 31st 2007). A noble achievement, I’m sure you’ll agree. Due to workload and assorted other commitments, I still don’t have anything…

The photo of the Northern ground hornbill Bucorvus abyssinicus featured here yesterday was posted entirely on a whim. And I figured that I didn’t need to say much about the species, nor about ground hornbills in general, given that they’ve been discussed at length on Tet Zoo before. But then I realised that the only…

The proofs for one of my books arrived the other day, so I have been busy busy busy. This (in part) explains the lack of action here on the blog, and the preponderance of recycled stuff. Sorry about that. In fact, sorry, here’s another recycled article from Tet Zoo ver 1. Hopefully I’ll have the…

In the previous post we looked at the small, island dwelling crocodilians of the south-west Pacific. I personally find it exciting that such animals were (in the case of at least some of the species) alive until just a few thousand years ago, that they were encountered by people, and that their remains have eluded…