mammalogy

Tetrapod Zoology

Category archives for mammalogy

So sorry for the very short notice. The following airs here in the UK tonight (Thursday 30th June 2011), Channel 4. I look forward to it.

The bearded pigs

One of the most remarkable pigs has to be the Bornean bearded pig Sus barbatus, one of two currently recognised bearded pig species. The other is the much smaller, shorter-faced Palawan bearded pig S. ahoenobarbus of the Philippines: genetic work suggests that S. ahoenobarbus is not a close relative of S. barbatus, but actually closer…

On March 14th 2011 National Geographic screened episode 1 of their new series Wild Case Files (here in the UK, the episode was screened on April 11th), and the reason I’m writing about it is because I featured in said episode. The first section of the show was devoted to an investigation of the ‘Montauk…

Over the past several months months and months I’ve been trying to complete a series of articles on the various sac- and pocket-like head and neck structures that have evolved in such diverse mammals as apes, horses, camels and baleen whales (links to the previous articles in the series are provided below). In an effort…

If you’re a regular reader you’ll have seen the recent article on those African ‘great bubalus’ depictions and on how they might (or might not) be representations of the large, long-horned bovin bovid Syncerus antiquus. As discussed in that article, S. antiquus – long thought to be a species of Pelorovis – is now regarded…

While chasing up sivathere stuff, I got distracted. Sorry. Among the most spectacular of extinct bovids is the Plio-Pleistocene African form Pelorovis, famous for its gigantic curved horns. These can span 3 m in fossil skulls, and were certainly even longer in the living animal. Pelorovis was built rather like a gigantic, long-horned version of…

I don’t do requests on Tet Zoo, but when enough people ask me about the same thing it does get into my head. Ever since the early days of ver 1 people have been asking me about late-surviving sivatheres. What, they ask, is the deal with those various pieces of rock art and that Sumerian…

Over the course of the previous 19 – yes, 19 – articles we’ve looked at the full diversity of vesper bat species (see links below if there are any parts you’ve missed). If you’ve been following the series on an article-by-article basis, you’ll hopefully now have a reasonable handle on the morphological, behavioural and ecological…

I find myself astonished by the fact that I’ve done it. With the publication of this article I’ve succeeded in providing a semi/non-technical overview of all the vesper bats of the world… or, of all the major lineages, anyway. Obviously, it hasn’t been possible to even mention all 400-odd vesper bat species, let alone all…

Among the best known, most widespread and most familiar of vesper bats are the pipistrelles. All bats conventionally regarded as pipistrelles are small (ranging from 3-20 g and 35-62 mm in head-body length), typically with proportionally short, broad-based ears and a jerky, rather erratic flying style.