Mesozoic dinosaurs

Tetrapod Zoology

Category archives for Mesozoic dinosaurs

One of the strangest Mesozoic dinosaurs ever described has to be the African iguanodontian Lurdusaurus arenatus, named in 1999 for remains from the Lower Cretaceous Elrhaz Formation of Gadoufaoua, Niger (Taquet & Russell 1999). The Elrhaz Formation has also yielded the sail-backed iguanodontian Ouranosaurus, the rebbachisaurid sauropod Nigersaurus, the theropods Kryptops, Suchomimus and Eocarcharia, and…

Steve Sweetman and I have just published a paper on a new maniraptoran theropod dinosaur from the Lower Cretaceous Wealden Supergroup of East Sussex, England (Naish & Sweetman 2011). As you might know if you’re a regular reader, much of my technical work has been devoted to Wealden theropods and I publish papers on them…

If asked “Why do giraffes have such long necks?”, the majority of people – professional biologists among them – will answer that it’s something to do with increasing vertical reach and hence feeding range. But while the ‘increased vertical reach’ or ‘increased feeding envelope’ hypothesis has always been the most popular explanation invoked to explain…

The sauropod viviparity meme

Fossils demonstrate beyond any doubt that Mesozoic dinosaurs laid eggs, as of course do all dinosaurs today. But back during the 1960s, 70s and 80s – back when Robert Bakker and his idea about dinosaur biology were regularly featured in magazines and other popular sources – the scientific community was (sarcasm alert) delighted and enthralled…

Tet Zoo = back in business

Well, the whole ‘distributed denial of service’ thing has done a pretty effective job of keeping me away from Tet Zoo entirely. No chance to blog, and not even the chance to look at the site at all – so, wow, thanks for keeping the protobats discussion going (97 98 comments… not bad). While those…

Welcome to part II of my musings on the 2010 blogging year. You’ll need to have read the first part to make sense of it. The article you’re reading now is extraordinarily long and I’d normally break up a piece of this length into two, three or even more separate articles. This year I want…

I read a lot of books in 2010, and mostly enjoyed all of them. Among my favourites was Luis Chiappe’s Glorified Dinosaurs: The Origin and Early Evolution of Birds, and in the lengthy review article below (currently in press for Historical Biology) you can find what I thought of it. Note that Glorified Dinosaurs is…

Time to wrap up on the SJG special – make sure you see part I and part II first. Wow, I never thought I’d end up writing three long articles on this series of papers (hmm, a familiar theme). In the previous articles we looked at stegosaur systematics, and at Heinrich Mallison’s work on the…

If you read the previous article on stegosaurs you’ll know that a collection of papers devoted to examination of this fascinating group appeared last year (2010) in a special issue of Swiss Journal of Geosciences (SJG from hereon). These papers resulted from a meeting held at the Sauriermuseum Aathal, Switzerland, in June 2009 (Billon-Bruyat &…

Among the most iconic and remarkable of dinosaurs are the stegosaurs, a mostly Jurassic group of thyreophorans famous for the rows of spikes and plates that decorated their necks, backs and tails [somewhat inaccurate Stegosaurus stenops shown below. I did it many years ago]. As I’m fond of saying, the stegosaur we know best –…