Mesozoic dinosaurs

Tetrapod Zoology

Category archives for Mesozoic dinosaurs

As you’ll know if you have your fingers on the throbbing pulse of dinosaur-related publications, the massive, incredibly pricey volume published by the Geological Society of London, and resulting from the 2008 meeting History of Dinosaurs and Other Fossil Saurians, now exists in dead-tree form. It’s titled Dinosaurs and Other Extinct Saurians: A Historical Perspective…

My three-part series on the ‘explosion of Iguanodon‘ is now complete and up on the Scientific American guest blog: part I is here, part II here, and part III here. Part III wraps things up and looks briefly at the social inertia that has held back our understanding of Iguanodon sensu lato, and also at…

Part I of a three-part series on the ‘explosion of Iguanodon‘ starts today at the Scientific American guest blog. This first part covers the background before looking at Altirhinus, Owenodon, Mantellisaurus and Dollodon – and there’s lots more to come. Please head on over, and be sure to do your commenting there, not here. Thanks.…

The science of Godzilla, 2010

The time has come to recycle this Tet Zoo classic, dating to February 2007 (it’s actually one of the oldest of Tet Zoo ver 2 articles). I’ve updated it a bit and have included new pics – enjoy! [image below from Kaiji anatomical drawings.. read on for discussion]. To begin with, let’s get things straight…

Among one of many interesting and perplexing Mesozoic fossil assemblages is that known from Cornet, Romania. I’ve been really interested in this collection of archosaur remains – currently housed at the Tarii Crisurilor Museum, Oradea – ever since I first heard about it in the 1990s, and recently I’ve been lucky enough to work with…

In the previous article on the 58th Symposium on Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy (SVPCA), held in Cambridge, UK, I discussed some of the work that was presented on stem-tetrapods and sauropods. This time round, we look at more Mesozoic stuff – pterosaurs in particular – before getting on to Cenozoic mammals.

I said I wouldn’t do any conferences this year. But I lied, and have recently returned from the 58th Symposium on Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy (SVPCA), this year held once again in Cambridge, UK. Compared to the enormous, sprawling SVP (= Society of Vertebrate Paleontology) meeting with its numerous concurrent sessions (last year held…

The last few weeks have been pretty exciting for people interested in theropod dinosaurs…. but then, you could say this about most weeks: new theropods are constantly being published. Last week saw the publication of the weird, functionally two-fingered, short-footed maniraptoran Balaur bondoc from the latest Cretaceous of the HaĊ£eg Basin in Romania (Csiki et…

Another book with my name on it has just appeared. Again it’s a kid’s book: Dorling Kindersley’s Know It All (Baines 2010) – a fantastically well illustrated, fact-packed encylopedia of everything science (and the successor to the highly successful 2009 Ask Me Anything). It’s a multi-authored book (authors: Simone Bos, Julie Ferris, Ian Graham, Susan…

Lately I’ve become quite fond of those really weird depictions of fossil animals that were utterly, utterly wrong, yet somehow managed to persist in the literature for decades. Last time round, we saw how the meme of the ‘demonic Quetzalcoatlus‘ passed from artist to artist, and had its genesis in a single, speculative illustration. Here’s…