Palaeozoic tetrapods

Tetrapod Zoology

Category archives for Palaeozoic tetrapods

I said I wouldn’t do any conferences this year. But I lied, and have recently returned from the 58th Symposium on Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy (SVPCA), this year held once again in Cambridge, UK. Compared to the enormous, sprawling SVP (= Society of Vertebrate Paleontology) meeting with its numerous concurrent sessions (last year held…

First of all, here are some temnospondyls. This composite image was compiled by repositioning the reconstructions provided by DeFauw (1989): looks neat, doesn’t it? So, I recently returned from the 69th Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting, this year held in Bristol, UK: in other words, OUTSIDE OF NORTH AMERICA for the first time ever. It…

I promised myself back in 2007 that I’d cut down on the number of conferences I attend. There’s a problem with that: I’m pretty bad at keeping promises (at least, to myself). This year I’m attending a ridiculous four conferences, and I’ve just returned from the first of them (please remind me why I have…

Lysorophians and aïstopods

At some stage, I’ll have to write full-length articles on lysorophians, aïstopods, the remaining temnospondyls, nectrideans, microsaurs, and assorted other groups of Palaeozoic and Mesozoic non-amniote tetrapods. Alas, this hasn’t happened yet. In the meantime, here are some slides from one of my talks…

2007 – Tet Zoo’s second year of operation – has come and gone. The previous article was a brief personal review of the year, and here’s more of the same (sort of) if you can handle it…

Among the many, many groups I have yet to cover on Tet Zoo are stem-group synapsids: Synapsida is the tetrapod clade that includes mammals and all of their relatives, and there is a long tradition of referring to non-mammalian synapsids as ‘mammal-like reptiles’ (other names include protomammals and paramammals). Because synapsids are not part of…

At last, I fulfill those promises of more temnospondyls. Last time we looked at the edopoids, perhaps the most basal temnospondyl clade: here we look at the rest of the basal forms. Scary predators, marine piscivores, late-surviving relics, and some unfortunate beasts burned alive in forest fires…

Today I submitted another one of those long-delayed manuscripts. Yay. I also got to work preparing one of the three conference talks I’m supposed to be giving this year – how the hell I’m going to pull off all three I’m not sure. Anyway, leaving well alone the whole picture-of-the-day debacle, it’s time for a…

Like plethodontid salamanders, Wealden dinosaurs, and rhinogradentians, the remarkably successful and diverse tetrapods known as temnospondyls have been riding the Tet Zoo wagon right since the earliest posts of ver 1. But, to my shame, I’ve never gotten round to completing one of the ten or so posts that I plan to publish on them.…