pterosaurs

Tetrapod Zoology

Category archives for pterosaurs

Once again I’m in that frustrating position so beloved of bloggers: where life and work just doesn’t let you fritter away all those ‘spare’ hours preparing lengthy blog articles. In the mean time, here’s one of those ‘mystery pictures’ to identify. What is it? Genus will do (I know the species, but that’s because I…

During the June and July of 2010 I and a host of friends and colleagues based at, or affiliated with, the University of Portsmouth attended the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition. As you’ll know if you saw the articles and pictures I posted here at Tet Zoo, our research group set up and displayed the…

In January 2011, Junchang Lü, David Unwin, Charles Deeming and colleagues published their Science paper on the amazing discovery of an egg-adult association in the Jurassic pterosaur Darwinopterus (Lü et al. 2011) [the specimen is shown here: image courtesy of Junchang Lü, Institute of Geology, Beijing, used with permission]. Darwinopterus is the incredible ‘transitional pterosaur’,…

We know all too little about the biology and behaviour of the pterosaurs, the amazing, often bizarre flying reptiles of the Mesozoic Era. Most of our ideas – about feeding behaviour, locomotion, physiology and social and sexual behaviour – are inferences based on bones, or inferences based on interpretations of the bones. A new paper…

It’s always been clear that pterosaurs were present in the Cornet assemblage (for the background on Cornet and its archosaur fossils, you need to have read part I). However, exactly what sort of pterosaurs are present at Cornet has been somewhat uncertain: the Late Jurassic ctenochasmatoid Cycnorhamphus, ornithocheirids and the Early Cretaceous Asian dsungaripterid Dsungaripterus…

Among one of many interesting and perplexing Mesozoic fossil assemblages is that known from Cornet, Romania. I’ve been really interested in this collection of archosaur remains – currently housed at the Tarii Crisurilor Museum, Oradea – ever since I first heard about it in the 1990s, and recently I’ve been lucky enough to work with…

In the previous article on the 58th Symposium on Vertebrate Palaeontology and Comparative Anatomy (SVPCA), held in Cambridge, UK, I discussed some of the work that was presented on stem-tetrapods and sauropods. This time round, we look at more Mesozoic stuff – pterosaurs in particular – before getting on to Cenozoic mammals.

Another book with my name on it has just appeared. Again it’s a kid’s book: Dorling Kindersley’s Know It All (Baines 2010) – a fantastically well illustrated, fact-packed encylopedia of everything science (and the successor to the highly successful 2009 Ask Me Anything). It’s a multi-authored book (authors: Simone Bos, Julie Ferris, Ian Graham, Susan…

In the previous article I discussed the outside section of the Royal Society Summer Science Exhibition’s pterosaur display (hosted at Royal Festival Hall on London’s South Bank). The exhibition (which finished on July 4th, sorry) incorporated three flying, life-sized azhdarchids – suspended from the two adjacent building – as well as two walking ones (the…

Regular readers of Tet Zoo will have seen the little clues given here and there to a big, infinitely cool project that’s been months and months in the making (here’s the first big hint, from August 2009). For some time now my colleagues Dave Martill, Bob Loveridge, Mark Witton and others at the University of…