speculative zoology

Tetrapod Zoology

Category archives for speculative zoology

Squamozoic sneak-peek # 2

When unable to find time to do anything else, resort to posting Squamozoic sneak-peeks (previous example here)… This scene – ‘Riverbank ambush’ – features a giant macro-predatory amphisbaenian and some surprised gekkotans. Colouring by Tim Morris. Feel free to discuss among yourself. Kinda busy right now…

Dixonian future animals of Brussels

I’ve just spent a few days at the Institut royal des Sciences naturelles de Belgique in Brussels, for theropod-related reasons. A great museum, with tons of excellent material on display. I just want to briefly report one interesting discovery here: I was surprised and delighted to find that the recently opened Gallery of Evolution includes…

I recently posted an updated version of the ‘Science of Godzilla’ article, and what a great success it was. But I’m kicking myself, because I totally forgot something else I should have mentioned: Tracy L. Ford recently had cause to produce a number of anatomical drawings of Zilla (aka GINO*/Deanzilla/Fraudzilla), the monster bipedal reptile that…

The science of Godzilla, 2010

The time has come to recycle this Tet Zoo classic, dating to February 2007 (it’s actually one of the oldest of Tet Zoo ver 2 articles). I’ve updated it a bit and have included new pics – enjoy! [image below from Kaiji anatomical drawings.. read on for discussion]. To begin with, let’s get things straight…

Squamozoic sneak-peek

Like it says. One day all will be revealed. Not yet. Thanks to Tim Morris

Tone and I recently went to see Avatar. I’ve been reading up on the movie for months and was really looking forward to seeing it. I mostly liked it, though did think it was a bit clichéd and predictable. But I’m not here to talk about storylines and plot devices… you want to know about…

Regular readers will know that I’m not exactly a fan of the idea – discussed here and there in the technical (Russell & Séguin 1982, Russell 1987), popular (Hecht 2007, Socha 2008, Naish 2008) and speculative literature (McLoughlin 1984, Magee 1993) – that non-avian theropod dinosaurs might have evolved into humanoids had they not bought…

In the previous article we looked at the Birds Come First, or BCF, hypothesis. It goes without saying that BCF has not won acceptance in the community, nor – in fact – is it even familiar to the majority of archosaur workers. Here, we take a critical view of BCF: does it stand up, or…

A substantial amount of evidence demonstrates that birds are theropod dinosaurs, and that birds evolved during the Jurassic from small, feathered maniraptoran theropods closely related to dromaeosaurids and troodontids (known collectively as deinonychosaurs) [the small dromaeosaurid Microraptor shown in adjacent image]. The precise details of avian origins remain the subject of debate, and argument continues…

Alien para-tetrapods of Snaiad

Back in June 2008, Nemo Ramjet launched the official website on Snaiad, one of humanity’s first off-world colonies. Snaiad’s spectacular wildlife has to be seen to be believed: I’ve been meaning to post a brief introduction to the site for months and here, in ‘text-lite’ week, is an excellent opportunity. If you like Nemo’s work…