Academia

Category archives for Academia

On Tuesday, Governor Bill Haslam of Tennessee allowed HB 368 to become law; it is the second of this new generation of creationist laws, along with a similar bill in Louisiana. Haslam refused to sign the bill, stating that it brought confusion, not clarity. He also noted that the bill had overwhelming legislative support (passing…

Marie-Claire Shanahan teaches science education at the University of Alberta, and blogs about her own research and about the state of science education (and science education training: science education education if you will). Her latest post summarizes her findings from reviewing science teaching guides going back over a century: Educators, critics, and scientists often argue for…

Elaine Howard Ecklund has a new paper out, building on her survey of scientists’ views on religion, research she reported in a book last year, and in a series of papers over the last few years. In this paper (press release for those of you who haven’t got access to the journal), she looks specifically…

The importance of being median

Peter Freed wants to you to know that Jonah Lehrer is Not a Neuroscientist. Lehrer doesn’t claim to be, of course. He’s a journalist and science writer who covers developments in neuroscience, and a good one at that. Freed is concerned about how Lehrer handled a recent study on “the wisdom of crowds” in a…

In cleaning out my open webpages, I came across the video above in an important post at Wired blogs, and it hardly matters that the post is from last October (yes, I keep too many tabs open in Firefox). Rhett Allain argues that there’s an inverse relationship between how much standardized testing students experience, and…

Aaron Schwarz has a petition urging The White House and Congress to unlock science research: Three years ago this week, the National Institutes of Health announced that all medical research they fund would have to be published as “open access” — available to anyone, for free, over the Internet. The policy has been a huge…

Mike the Mad Biologist weighs in on a debate Brad Delong has been curating, about the status of economics as a science. Noting that examples from biology are being introduced as comparisons for economics, Mike writes: It really does matter: if economists are going to use biology as a model for their discipline, we need…

A Bleg about Egypt and Archaeology

Anyone know of archeologists reading the tea leaves on the implications for Zahi Hawass being made a cabinet minister in Egypt? Hawass is the telegenic spokesman for Egypt’s rich trove of antiquities, regularly featuring in TV shows about mummies and pyramids, and undoubtedly helping keep tourists flowing to Egypt (tourism is the major national industry).…

Nature: “Stand up for science”

This week’s Nature has a great report on efforts to get scientists more active in policy discussions. It starts with an ecologist who got some media training, which gave her the courage to go on the Colbert Report and defend a paper she co-authored about the dangers of mountaintop removal. From there, we get a…

Yet more on graduation rates

Thanks to Razib, I’ve managed to separate out Hispanic graduation rates in our new favorite graph (cf. and also): I didn’t put this on the graph, but immigration history does make a difference here. Hispanics born in the US have essentially the same high school graduation rate as everyone else, go to college more often…