Philosophy of Science

Category archives for Philosophy of Science

Bayesianism

As I’m clearing out material I keep meaning to write about, I came across an excellent post about Bayesianism and 21st century intellectualism: Popperian falsification is just a special case of the Bayesian view: if the likelihood P(data|model) is zero (indicating that the data is impossible given the model), P(model|data) is zero, regardless of the…

At Billy Dembski’s place, GilDodgen quotes Denyse O’Leary: Bear with a simple lay hack here a moment: Why must we know a designer?s intentions in order to detect design? If the fire marshall?s office suspects arson, do the investigators worry much about WHY? Surely they investigate, confirm their finding, and turn the information over to…

The Demarcation Problem and Truth

Telic Thoughts responds (sort of) to a point I made yesterday. In the course of arguing that creationists and postmodernists talk about science the same way ? as “microfascist,” etc. ? I pointed out a TT post with some confused thoughts on demarcation between science and non-science. Macht replies: I wasn’t talking about what was…

A month or so back, someone very strange published an article explaining how evidence based medicine is “fascist.” Evidence based medicine, of course “is the conscientious, explicit and judicious use of current best evidence in making decisions about the care of individual patients.” How horribly fascist. Indeed, the main individual targeted for “fascism” was himself…

Altruism, and why ID doesn’t matter

IDolatrous bloggers ask Is altruism all about cost-to-benefit ratios?, and conclude after reviewing a paper in Science that lays out the current thinking on the evolution of altruism: Of course, there is another avenue for thinking about altruism: but this means going beyond neodarwinism and entertaining the thought that human beings need to be explained…

Stupid is as stupid does

DaveScot, apparently just having figured out PZ Myers’ first name, has a problem: I have a problem with these people in that they arbitrarily limit what science can potentially explain. The so called supernatural remains supernatural only as long as there?s no metric by which to measure it. Once a metric is discovered the supernatural…

In poking around for information on a forthcoming post, I encountered an aspect of the life of John Dewey that I had previously been unaware of. I know of Dewey for his work in education, and for advocating pragmatism as a philosophy. It turns out that, in addition to his famous applications of that philosophy…

Reposted from ye olde site, in preparation for another post soon to come. Ed Brayton asks Is Risk of Theocracy Overblown? His answer is a slightly qualified “Yes.” And he highlights why I don’t rail against theocracy, but against “religious authoritarianism.” While he may be right that Dobson and Falwell (or Fox and Johnston in…

Gibberish

I don’t read Greg Easterbrook, for roughly the same reason I don’t read anything else in the sports pages. When I want to get the experience of bulky men straining themselves trying to exceed their innate abilities, I watch C-SPAN. I was reminded of why I don’t read Easterbrook by a comment that Brad Delong…

An IDolator explains the problem

I think Gil means something different, but this pretty much explains why IDC doesn’t make any sense: A microbe did not mysteriously mutate into Mozart and his music, and most people, thankfully, are smart enough to figure out that this is a silly idea. This is essentially what ID argues. With a few magical tweaks…