“Established by the state.” Those are the four words at the center of an upcoming Supreme Court case that could strip affordable health insurance coverage from millions of working families and result in billions of dollars in uncompensated care costs.

Not an “accident”: John P. Stoll, 58, suffers fatal work-related injury in Madison, WI

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on February 20, 2015 in Madison, WI.

Highs and lows of Labor Department websites

MSHA continues to develop new ways for the public to access its enforcement data, while parts of OSHA’s website have been “temporarily unavailable” since early this year.

Notable quotes on wages and public health

Minnesota’s health commissioner prescribes an increase in the minimum wage to improve people’s health.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Workers continue to face dangerous exposures to diacetyl; paid sick leave legislation introduced in West Virginia; home health workers rally for living wages; and the rise of the independent contractor classification threatens worker rights.

Last week, FDA warned healthcare providers that the complex design of a piece of endoscopy eqiupment may make it hard to fully disinfect — which means that using it, even in accordance with the manufacturers’ instructions, might allow dangerous bacteria to spread between patients.

While silicosis-related deaths have declined, it remains a serious occupational health risk and one that requires continued public health attention, according to recent data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Not an “accident”: Norberto Galicia Romero, 49, suffers fatal work-related injury in Marrietta, GA

This week’s snapshot of just one work-related fatality in the US. This one occurred on February 16, 2015 in Marrietta, GA.

Last week, US Representative Rosa DeLauro (D-CT) and Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) reintroduced the Healthy Families Act, which would allow US workers to earn paid sick time.

In 2010, New York City health officials launched a new food safety tactic that assigned restaurants an inspection-based letter grade and required that the grade be posted where passersby could easily see it. So, did this grading make a difference? A new study finds that it has, with the probability of restaurants scoring in the A-range up by 35 percent.