In July, public health departments across the country got a letter from the Trump administration abruptly cutting off funding for teen pregnancy prevention efforts in the middle of the program’s grant cycle. The move means that many teens will miss out on receiving an education that could — quite literally — change the trajectory of their lives.

Free satellite air quality data is available to public health agencies and researchers. A NASA team hopes to utilize it to improve human health.

Health and environmental groups sue EPA over new rules on toxics

Three lawsuits by different public health and environmental groups are challenging EPA’s new regulations on prioritizing and evaluating toxic chemicals. The regulations stem from amendments made by Congress last year to the 40 year old Toxic Substances Control Act. The groups argue that EPA is ignoring congressional intent.

Recent pieces address taking children from their parents, limited treatment options for opioid use disorder, and how police violence is a reproductive justice issue. (Updated 8/16 with links to Charlottesville-related pieces)

Umair Shah’s story isn’t an uncommon one in public health. Starting out in medicine, with a career as an emergency department doctor, he said it quickly became clear that most of what impacts our health happens outside the hospital and in the community.

Occupational Health News Roundup

Age bias a challenge to prove in the workplace; coal miner deaths up over last year; workers protest after the death of a California farmworker; and the United Auto Workers looks forward after union defeat at Nissan plant in Mississippi.

Mourning writer Lizzie Grossman: The Pump Handle readers will miss her

The Pump Handle mourns the death of Lizzie Grossman. She was a contributor to The Pump Handle for more than six years. Lizzie’s first dozen blog posts featured her reporting about the Deepwater Horizon clean-up.

A Center for Progressive Reform analysis of the Trump administration’s first regulatory agenda finds delay and abandonment of dozens of rules designed to protect public health.

Public trust in science is a fickle creature. Surveys show a clear majority of Americans believe science has positively impacted society, and they’re more likely to trust scientists on issues like climate change and vaccines. On the other hand, surveys also find that factors like politics, religion, age and race can greatly impact the degree of that trust. It presents a delicate challenge for agencies that depend on trust in science to do their jobs.

U.S. investments in global health research have saved millions of lives and prevented immeasurable suffering. And by working to detect, treat and eventually eliminate infectious diseases worldwide, we’re protecting our own country too. That cliché about diseases knowing no borders is unfortunately very true. All that alone should be enough to remain committed to the cause.