Friday Blog Roundup

Pharmaceuticals seem to be a big topic in the blogosphere this week. Roy M. Poses MD at Health Care Renewal has more on the Zyprexa memos – which, if you haven’t been following this issue, reportedly show that manufacturer Eli Lilly suppressed information about this schizophrenia drug’s harmful side effects. Abel Pharmboy at Terra Sigillata reports on the perils of buying drugs online (and, in a post from last week, he worries about the number of people Googling DCA), and Orac at Respectful Insolence delves into the topic of experimental drug availability.

As has been the trend recently, there are also lots of interesting posts related to climate change.  Gar Lipow at Gristmill examines emission trading’s mixed record; Juliane Fry at RealClimate explains the least understood component of the climate system; Joel Makower at Two Steps Forward recaps the many steps taken around climate change over the past 50 days; and Tim Lambert at Deltoid fact-checks a Wall Street Journal op-ed on global warming and DDT.

In other news …

Revere at Effect Measure points us to two related stories: lunchboxes with high lead levels, and a recess appointment to the U.S. Consumper Product Safety Commission.

Anne Landman at PR Watch digs into a Philip Morris memo to learn about their possible motivation for backing tobacco regulation.

Mike Dunford at The Questionable Authority updates us on new developments in the world of astroturf lobbying.

Aman at Technology, Health & Development considers Cuba’s healthcare infrastructure and information systems.

Amie Newman at RH Reality Check highlights The Lancet’s series on maternal mortality.

Sarah Jane Hise at Global Health Policy reports that the U.S. still has a chance to take a leadership role in global vaccine development.

Adam Stein at Gristmill tackles the “putting a price tag on nature” idea.

What else is worth a read? Leave suggestions in the comments.

Comments

  1. #1 Abel Pharmboy
    February 23, 2007

    Thanks for the links, Liz. It is frightening to me just how many people are trying to self-medicate with sodium dichloroacetate (or worse, dichloroacetic acid!) based on the hype from one paper – a very good paper – but with mostly cell culture data and one set of experiments on a human lung cancer line implanted into immunocompromised rats. Many, many drugs have shown anticancer efficacy in animals only to fail in clinical trials.

  2. #2 Aman
    February 24, 2007

    Thanks for doing the Friday blog roundup – it is a really helpful way to see what others are talking about and to develop a community around public health issues. I wish there were more public health type bloggers out there! We all certainly could use the exchange.