Archives for May, 2007

When You Don’t Get to Say Goodbye

Sunday, May 20th, 2007, marked the first anniversary of the Kentucky Darby Mine Explosion, which claimed the lives of five good men: Jimmy Lee, Amon Brock, Roy Middleton, Paris Thomas, Jr., and Bill Petra.

Friday Blog Roundup

This week, bloggers had plenty to say regarding the new study raising safety questions about the diabetes drug Avandia. The Olive Ridley Crawl and Merrill Goozner at GoozNews emphasize the importance of transparency around clinical trials, while Cervantes at Stayin’ Alive explains what’s wrong with using surrogate markers (as the Avandia studies used in the…

Can the FDA End the U.S. Tobacco Problem?

Today, the Institute of Medicine released its report Ending the Tobacco Problem: A Blueprint for the Nation. In a public briefing Richard J. Bonnie, Chair of the IOM Committee on Reducing Tobacco Use, explained that “ending the tobacco problem” means reducing tobacco use “so substantially that it is no longer a significant public health problem.”…

By Susan Wood The recent study in the NEJM clearly points out that our drug safety system is in need of repair.  We shouldn’t need these constant reminders, from Vioxx to Ketek and now to Avandia.  Indeed FDA reform legislation is moving through Congress as we speak.  But does it do what we need it…

Occupational Health News Roundup

Two stories in the news this week draw attention to contract workers, who are sometimes overlooked when it comes to workplace health and safety. Legislation proposed by U.S. Representative Al Green would enable federal prosecutors to pursue criminal cases against employers whose willful violations of safety rules are linked to deaths of contract workers (not only of…

The public (that’s you) have until May 24 to comments on EPA’s list of nominees for its Science Advisory Board panel on asbestos.  David Michaels has weighed in on this issue  and is submitting his comments today to EPA.  Another organization providing input is the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC).  Writing on behalf of NRDC, senior scientist Jennifer Sass…

Workers’ Comp Peril for a Double Amputee

The sub-headline in Andrew Wolfson’s story tells it all about the perils of workers’ compensation for injured and ill workers: “It’s either meager benefits or nearly impossible suit.”  The Louisville-Courier Journal reporter’s May 19 article describes both the physical and economic challenges faced by William D. “Billy” Parker, who lost both arms four months ago in a drywall shedding…

Haunting Tale from an MSHA Inspector

“That mine scared me to death,” is the headline for the Charleston Gazette‘s story by stellar reporter Ken Ward.  He relays the experience of MSHA inspector, Minness Justice, who was responsible for inspecting A.T. Massey’s Aracoma Alma No. 1 mine in the three month’s preceding the coal mine fire on January 19, 2006, which killed miners Don Bragg, 33 and…

Friday Blog Roundup

With all the interesting new research coming out, it’s good that we have bloggers to help us stay on top of it all. The Olive Ridley Crawl explains the basics behind the reports on chemicals linked to breast cancer; Corpus Callosum looks at a Health Affairs article that helps put drug risks in perspective; Andrew…

$60 Penalty for Sago Mine Operator?

When MSHA issued its 190-page report last week on the January 2006 Sago Mine disaster, most of the press focused on the agency’s conclusion that a lightning strike was the “most likely ignition source” for the explosion.  Readers should not forget however, that 29 coal miners were underground at the time of the explosion.  Only one (Mr. Terry…