Archives for June, 2007

Friday Blog Roundup

Declan Butler, Reporter updates us on the situation of the six health workers facing death in Libya. The five Bulgarian nurses and Palestinian medic were sentenced to death on the charge of deliberately infecting Libyan children with HIV, despite scientific evidence that the infections resulted from hygiene lapses and contamination of medical material. Butler reports…

by Les Boden I’m going to answer this question. But before I do, I’m going to have to explain a few things about (ugh!) insurance.

House Committee Passes Diacetyl Bill

With a bipartisan voice vote yesterday, the House Education and Labor Committee approved a bill that would force OSHA to regulate workers’ exposure to diacetyl. Congresswoman Lynn Woolsey, chair of the Subcommittee on Workforce Protections  and chief sponsor of the legislation, commented: What’s troubling is that if OSHA had taken action in a timely manner,…

By David Michaels Lifelines Online, the safety and health publication of the Laborers’ Health and Safety Fund of North America, is publicizing some important videos – dealing with the history of occupational health and safety in the U.S., industrial hygiene pioneer Alice Hamilton, and the lung disease silicosis – that are now available for free…

Occupational Health News Roundup

Following up on their investigative series on conditions at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center, the Washington Post’s Dana Priest and Anne Hull have written a series of wrenching articles on veterans returning from Iraq with post-traumatic stress disorder. Bureaucratic confusion and a shortage of mental health resources leave many PTSD sufferers with little hope,…

In Memoriam: Charleston, SC Fire Fighters

“As fire fighters, we know the risks of answering the call, but it does not lessen our pain when the worst happens,” said Harold Schaitberger, general president of the Int’l Association of Fire Fighters. Nine fire fighters, aged 27 to 56, died on June 18 battling a blaze at a furniture warehouse in Charleston, SC.  The city’s…

Several members of the U.S. House and Senate introduced bills today to strengthen mine safety and health protections.  A  statement issued by Congressman George Miller (D-CA) says the bill builds upon the legislation passed in June 2006 called the MINER Act. 

Food Aid with Strings Attached

Most public health advocates are probably already aware that U.S. funds for international AIDS relief come with counterproductive strings attached – specifically, requirements that one-third of HIV prevention money go to abstinence-only education and that entities receiving PEPFAR grants explicitly denounce prostitution. (Laurie Garrett’s recent LA Times op-ed provides a good summary of the policies…

A public health disgrace in Minnesota

by Revere, cross-posted from Effect Measure If you’ve ever been to Duluth, Minnesota in the wintertime, at the top of the state on Lake Superior, you know how cold it can get. And if you go another 50 miles up the shore you’ll come to Silver Bay. Also cold. And dangerous in another way. It…

Federal Judge Robert C. Chambers, US District Court for the Southern District of West Virginia, ruled in favor of environmental groups in their claim against coal mine operators and practices related to mountaintop removal mining.*  This form of surface mining involves blasting off the top of mountains, scooping out the coal, and dumping the unwanted rock and…