Friday Blog Roundup

In recognition of the second anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, Chris Mooney and Sheril Kirshenbaum at The Intersection provide a series of posts about the lessons from this disaster. At Gristmill, Joseph Romm explains why Hurricane Katrina busts the myth that humans can adapt to climate change.

Elsewhere:

Grrl Scientist at Living the Scientific Life (Scientist, Interrupted) reviews the book Lab 257 and explains why some suspect that Lyme Disease and West Nile virus can be traced to an animal disease research lab.

Tara Smith at Aetiology tells the story of the Marburg virus, which is back in the news.

Cervantes at Stayin’ Alive assesses the prospects for healthcare reform after the next U.S. election.

Jason Heilpern at Hazard’s Recognized offers advice, based on experience, about how to get company officials to pay for safety.

Janet Stemwedel at Adventures in Ethics and Science considers the gray areas between extreme positions on animal research (follow-up here); Nick Anthis at The Scientific Activist and Abel Pharmboy at Terra Sigillata share their thoughts on animal research, too.

Merrill Goozner at GoozNews traces a very costly S-CHIP earmark back to its source and explores what it will mean for patients.

Matt Madia at Reg Watch reports on the public response to EPA’s proposed ozone standard. 

Amanda at Enviroblog summarizes new research on how large-scale hog farms spread antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

The World’s Fair interviews Lizzie Grossman, author of High Tech Trash: Digital Devices, Hidden Toxins, and Human Health.

Mitchell Anderson at DeSmogBlog announces the launch of an investigation to uncover the reason that NASA’s Deep Space Climate Observatory project has been cancelled. DeSmogBlog is requesting donations to fund their detective work. 

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