Occupational Health News Roundup

Ground Zero workers are still in the news. Last week, a House Panel heard from Dr. Philip Landrigan of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine about the illnesses these workers suffer from. Earlier this week, several members of New York’s Congressional delegation introduced the James Zadroga 9/11 Health and Compensation Act, which would would establish a long-term program to provide a broad range of physical and mental health services to Ground Zero workers.

In other news:

Charleston Gazette: According to new federal data, black lung disase rates in U.S. coal miners have doubled over the last decade.

BBC: A new technique may help show if a person’s health has been damaged by chemical exposure – and it could have an enormous impact on workers’ compensation claims.

Houston Chronicle: A ruling from the Texas Supreme Court makes it easier for employers to shield themselves from liability claims. (Also see the Chronicle’s editorial on the ruling.)

Houston, We Have a Problem: Houston Organization of Public Employees has launched a new website to alert residents that city workers do tough, dirty, dangerous jobs to make Houston livable – but are paid substantially less than their counterparts in other cities. (via AFL-CIO Weblog)

Occupational Hazards: At the OSF St. Francis Medical Center in Peoria, Illinois, a new lift team (which provides patient transfer and mobility assistance) has substantially reduced staff injuries associated with patient handling activities and improved staff satisfaction.

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