Archives for June, 2008

Friday Blog Roundup

Bloggers turn their attention to the floods in the Midwest: Tara C. Smith of Aetiology is in the thick of the Iowa City-Cedar Rapids floods. She reminds us that preparedness can pay off for floods as well as flu, and that residents need to consider several health issues as the flood waters recede. We wish…

Doubt at Firedoglake, and More Rave Reviews

On Saturday June 21st, I’ll be the guest on the Firedoglake Book Salon, talking about my new book “Doubt is Their Product: How Industry’s Assault on Science Threatens Your Health.” Please join me from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM Eastern time, for what promises to be an interesting conversation. Doubt continues to get rave reviews.…

We’ve written before about how important it is for the presidential candidates to let the public know where they stand on science issues. Now, the Scientists and Engineers for America Action Fund, in partnership with 15 prominent scientific and engineering societies, is asking Congressional candidates where they stand on science-related issues, including climate change, water,…

Taking Food Safety Seriously

Salmonella-tainted tomatoes have sickened at least 277, although the Seattle PI’s Andrew Schneider cites a CDC estimate of 8,600 people who’ve become ill during this outbreak. Congress has reacted to this and other food and drug safety problems by forcing additional funding on the FDA, which isn’t allowed to ask for more money than the…

Remember the Dec 19 T2 Lab Explosion?

Updated (6/19/08) below Just before last year’s holiday season,  Charles Budds Bolchoz, 48; best friends Karey Renard Henry, 35, and Parish Lamar Ashley, 36; and company owner Robert Scott Gallagher, 49, lost their lives in a violent explosion at T2 Laboratories in Jacksonville, Florida (previous posts here, here).  The firm manufacturered Ecotane®, a gasoline additive “methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl” (i.e., …

Miners’ Deaths and Deadbeat Operators

Mr. Robert Carey, 45, an athracite coal miner from Shamokin, Pennsylvania was killed on Monday by falling rock/coal at the Harmony Mine.  So far this year, 26 workers at U.S. mining operations have died on-the-job.  Just this past Sunday, former MSHA chief J. Davitt McAteer had an Op-Ed in the Charleston Gazette entitled: ”Enough: No More Mining Deaths.”   He wrote:…

Occupational Health News Roundup

The New York Times reports this week that Charles M. Smith, the Army official responsible for overseeing the Pentagon’s multi-billion-dollar contract with KBR during the first two years after the Iraq invasion, says he was removed from his job for refusing to pay the company more than $1 billion in charges for which it lacked…

Department of Defending Itself

Back in April, a Government Accountability Office report explained how the White House Office of Management and Budget was holding up EPA’s IRIS (Integrated Risk Information System) assessments. OMB had started requiring an “interagency review” process allowing agencies that might be affected by the IRIS assessments to provide comments on the documents – and as…

Avoid This Industrial Hygienist

Ever been frustrated by an industrial hygienist who just didn’t seem to get it?  The dude comes in with his air tubes, calibrators, gizmos and gadgets, but barely says a peep to the workers.  I’m not talking about the talented IH’s out there—who understand that talking to the exposed workers is an integral part of their job.  No, I’m talking about…

Crane Industry Disgusted with OSHA Delay

Updated below ( 6/18/08 ) Earlier this month I wrote in “Crashing Cranes, Deaths and the White House’s Edict” about the inexcusable inaction by the US Department of Labor and OSHA to address the decades-old problem of crane-related deaths.  I am not alone in my disgust at this regulatory system, which yet again is failing to protect our nation’s…