Archives for September, 2008

Seeking Government Scientists

I’m repeating myself here, but it’s for a good cause. At the Project on Scientific Knowledge and Public Policy at George Washington University School of Public Health, we’ve launched a multi-part study to understand the current policies surrounding scientists’ work at government agencies and to create recommendations for policies that support strong science and the…

FDA Favors Industry Science on BPA

by Sarah Vogel On Friday, August 15, the FDA released its draft assessment of the safety of bisphenol A (BPA).  To the frustration and deep consternation of many, the regulatory agency upheld the current safety standard for human exposure to BPA in food.  The agency based their decision on two large multigenerational studies funded by…

Chinese baby formula scandal

by revere, cross-posted at Effect Measure Two of my grandsons were here today. They are just babies (16 months and month and half) but one of them is a little colicky. He looks like he is having cramps after downing his formula. But compared to some babies in China, it’s nothing. The formula they’ve been…

Friday Blog Roundup

Bloggers offer advice and observations related to the election: David Roberts at Gristmill went to the RNC convention and observed that the GOP has three different views on energy: “what the pols and power brokers believe, what they tell the base, and what they tell the elite media and political establishment.” Also at Gristmill, Marianne…

Iraq veterans and Lou Gehrig’s Disease

by revere, cross-posted at Effect Measure Bush has announced he will reduce the forces in Iraq by 8000 by early 2009. My first thought (after “that’s it? I thought we were victorious”; and let’s get all of them out now as fast as we can) was to wonder what condition they will be in and…

Occupational Health News Roundup

José Herrera, a contract worker at a Citgo refinery in Corpus Christi, was working on equipment when a pipe ruptured and scorched one-third of his body with 550-degree oil. Herrera is now disabled and in constant pain, even in his sleep. Workers’ compensation insurance covers his extensive medical costs, but his lost-wages compensation equals only…

By Mary Carol Jennings In the setting of the upcoming elections, my Senator, Jim DeMint, recently wrote a letter of opinion to the Washington Times opposing a global HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria bill that will provide life-saving medications and prevention against infectious disease in the developing world.  Though the White House and a broad bipartisan…

Popcorn Lawsuits and a Weak Regulatory System

The Seattle Post-Intelligencer’s Andrew Schneider reports on another lawsuit from a consumer who says his lungs have been damaged by years of microwave popcorn consumption. The most famous microwave-popcorn consumer, Wayne Watson of Denver, filed suit earlier this year. Watson drew national attention after he was diagnosed with bronchiolitis obliterans, a disease previously found only…

Carnival Time

Our post on preventing falls among the elderly has been included in the latest edition of Hourglass, a monthly blog carnival devoted to the biology of aging. Alvaro at SharpBrains has assembled recent aging-related posts in a creative format; for more, check out Ouroboros for the Hourglass archive, submission info, and upcoming schedule. Blog carnivals  are…

The recent issues of Newsweek and TIME both carried sobering articles about the state of cancer research. Newsweek’s Sharon Begley reports that cancer is on track to claim 565,650 lives in the U.S. this year, and that number isn’t a whole lot better than it was in 1971, when President Nixon signed the National Cancer…