Occupational Health News Roundup

It’s open season at many workplaces, the time when employers who offer health benefits let employees choose among different health coverage options for the coming year. The Wall Street Journal’s Anna Wilde Matthews reports that companies are reluctant to raise workers’ share of premiums, given that wages are stagnant, and many are instead increasing deductibles and co-payments. So, read the fine print on your enrollment documents, and plan ahead for these costs.

In other news:

Boston Globe: In an effort to address disproportionately high injury rates among immigrant workers, a coalition in Somerville, Massachusetts is working to raise awareness of occupational health risks and teach workers their rights.

The News Journal (Delaware): Many nurses are juggling too many patients, which can lead to nurse burnout as well as patient-safety concerns. Without significant changes, a worsening nursing shortage looms (via Kaisernetwork.org).

CIDRAP: Planning fatigue and the financial crisis threaten businesses’ pandemic planning efforts, but experts urge employers to strengthen their preparations.

NIOSH: Although facilities using metal-working fluids have improved working conditions, many work sites still have inadequate ventilation, poor metal-working fluid maintenance, a lack of machine enclosures, and inadequate medical surveillance.

World Economic Forum: The Global Health Initiative of the World Economic Forum and The Lilly MDR-TB Partnership have launched a toolkit to help Chinese companies tackle the tuberculosis crisis. Nearly 1.3 million people are diagnosed with tuberculosis in China every year.