Archives for November, 2008

Occupational Health News Roundup

Nearly 1,300 people have been killed in the Mexican city of Juarez so far this year, and journalists are among those targeted by the mafia. On November 13, Armando Rodriguez, a 40-year-old reporter for El Diaro de Juarez, was gunned down as he sat in his car in his driveway. Two other reporters have received…

Food for Thought

We’ve mentioned before that the Obama administration will soon be focusing on developing new  approaches to consumer-product safety. It’s worth remembering some of the solutions that have been proposed over the past couple of years, as high-profile problems with contaminated food and drugs have raised concerns about the ability of the Food and Drug Administration…

Secrecy prevails on DOL’s risk assessment rule

Labor Secretary Chao issued her semi-annual regulatory today, listing allegedly the Department’s “regulations that have been selected for review or development during the coming year.”  It all might seem kind of pointless (given that she won’t have a say after Jan 20) but the document is in fact enlightening for what it doesn’t mention.  There’s no peep about…

Friday Blog Roundup

The big news in Congress this week is that Henry Waxman (D-Calif.) has replaced John Dingell (D-Mich.) as chair of the House Energy and Commerce Committee – a move likely to have big implications for national climate policy, as Kate Sheppard at Gristmill explains. Meanwhile, Alicia Mundy at WSJ’s Health Blog wonders if the leadership…

A three-judge panel of the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will hear oral arguments today about OSHA’s rule on hexavalent chromium.  OSHA issued the rule in February 2006, after this same Court of Appeals instructed the Agency in December 2002 to do so.  (According to Law.com, the attorneys for the parties learned only two weeks ago that…

An underground coal miner who works in eastern Kentucky took the next step in his legal battle to force the Secretary of Labor to reduce respirable dust levels in our nation’s coal mines.  It started in March 2008 when Scott Howard of Lechter County, KY filed a lawsuit in federal court (Howard v. Chao) against the Secretary of Labor and the Mine Safety…

Occupational Health News Roundup

Forty years ago today, a series of explosions ripped through the No. 9 Mine in Farmington, West Virginia and killed 78 workers. For nine days, families and friends of trapped miners waited in the hope that some of the miners would survive – but none did, and the mine was finally sealed, with the bodies…

Worker fatally injured at my workplace

Mr. Rosaulino Montano, 46, an employee of  Engineered Construction Products of Smithsburg, MD fell seven stories to his death on Tuesday, Nov 18 on the campus of my workplace, the George Washington University (GWU).  Mr. Montano was installing windows at a $75 million residence hall under construction at F St and 22nd St. on the Foggy Bottom campus.  The 10-story building will…

Our regular readers are well aware of the product defense tactics pioneered by the tobacco industry and taken to a new level by manufacturers of other dangerous products. Hazards magazine has just put out a new article about a manganese company that’s following that playbook faithfully, even though it’s clear that its factory is making…

Gulf War illness: getting real

by revere, cross-posted at Effect Measure A congressionally mandated independent panel of scientists has just issued a report verifying what many of us have know since the early 1990s. Gulf War Syndrome (GWS) is real: