Friday Blog Roundup

Bloggers weigh in on some of the questions in US healthcare reform:

  • Ezra Klein explains what a public insurance option is, and describes three different forms it could take.
  • Maggie Mahar at Health Beat asks whether health insurers are really giving up much ground when they promise community ratings in exchange for an individual mandate, and considers what kinds of reforms will get enough votes in Congress.
  • Henry Aaron at The Treatment advocates limiting the tax benefits for employer health insurance.
  • Also at The Treatment, Jonathan Cohn reminds us that universal coverage can also benefit those who already have insurance.

Elsewhere:

Matthew Madia at The Fine Print brings us the news from a new GAO report: The Department of Labor often ignores wage and child-labor violations.

Janet Stemwedel at Adventures in Ethics in Science grapples with the ethical considerations around giving illegal drugs to addicts participating in research.

Ken Ward Jr. at Coal Tattoo recaps the news about EPA’s announcement that it would take a closer look at mountaintop removal mining permits – which may not be as big a deal as many activists and reporters seem to think.

At WSJ’s Health Blog, Shirley Wang reports that the American Psychiatric Association has announced it will drop all industry-sponsored meals and educational sessions from its annual conferences, and James White has the latest on Glaxo’s policies about publishing the names of doctors and institutions that the company pays to conduct drug trials.

Jamila Taylor at RH Reality Check urges the US government to make prevention a priority in PEPFAR, because that’s crucial for addressing the impacts of HIV/AIDS on women and girls.

Rhona at The Lancet Student reminds us about London’s “Great Stink” 151 years ago and looks at today’s sanitation challenges.

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