Archives for June, 2010

Occupational Health News Roundup

Mine explosions in China and Columbia in recent weeks have killed a total of 120 mineworkers. An explosion in a coal mine in Antioquia, Colombia, killed 73 mineworkers; a total of 160 were in the mine at the time of the blast, and 90 escaped. Gas accumulations prevented rescue and recovery teams from entering the…

The ScienceBlogs Book Club continues the discussion on Mark Pendergrast’s Inside the Outbreaks: The Elite Medical Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service – come on over and join in! In my post today, I look at the difference between solving disease puzzles (figuring out what the agent is, how it’s being transmitted, etc) and solving…

by Eula Bingham & Anthony Robbins On April 20th, when the Deepwater Horizon offshore oil rig exploded, eleven workers died. Since then thousands of Gulf Coast citizens have responded to the disaster. Few are professional clean-up workers, but these responders stepped forward rapidly to protect their communities from the consequences of the man-made catastrophe. Health…

By Elizabeth Grossman “This is my place. This is my peace. This is where I come to pray. Now it’s damaged for years to come,” Dauphin Islander Angela Bonner tells me as we stand on the pier that stretches out over the beach. This fine white sand beach on Alabama’s Gulf Coast is nearly empty…

New Solutions: The Drawing Board is a monthly feature produced by the journal New Solutions. Read more about it here. By Richard Clapp The President’s Cancer Panel report released on May 6 had some strong findings and recommendations on ways to reduce the cancer burden caused by workplace exposures. This is welcome news to U.S.…

If you haven’t already, go read Katy Butler’s powerful New York Times Magazine piece about her aging father’s years of decline and the hard decisions she and her mother had to make about his care. Butler’s father suffered a stroke at age 79, and she writes of its effect:

News from Sunstein’s OIRA on worker and environmental health regs

When President Obama nominated Prof. Cass Sunstein to head the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) many of us in the public health community were worried. He was, afterall, an academic who authored a paper entitled, “Is OSHA unconstitutional?” and another “Is the Clean Air Act unconstitutional?” Our colleagues at the Center for Progressive…

MSHA’s next step toward openness, while another worker dies at Arizona ASARCO copper mine

MSHA took another step toward openness by posting on its website the “preliminary report of accident” form for the most recent fatal injury incidents at US mining operations. The MSHA Form 7000-13 is the first record made by agency personnel when they are notified of a worker death, serious injury or other reportable event such…

The ScienceBlogs Book Club has come back to life, and is now featuring Mark Pendergrast’s Inside the Outbreaks: The Elite Medical Detectives of the Epidemic Intelligence Service. Mark Pendergrast’s introductory post is well worth a read. He describes Alexander Langmuir, the “visionary leader” who founded the Epidemic Intelligence Service within the CDC in 1951; gives…

Two years after crane collapse killed four workers in Texas, an update

When one of the nation’s largest mobile cranes–the Versa TC 36000—collapsed on July 18, 2008 at the LyondellBasell refinery in Pasadena, TX, four workers lost their lives: Marion “Scooter” Hubert Odom III, 41; John D. Henry, 33; Daniel “DJ” Lee Johnson; Rocky Dale Strength, 30. I wrote about this terrible crane disaster at the time,…